Radius of trust

Social capital in relation to familism and institutional collectivism

Anu Realo, Jüri Allik, Brenna Greenfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Countries in which people believe that "most people can be trusted" and where citizens belong to a larger number of different voluntary associations are more individualistic, emphasizing the importance of independence and freedom to choose one's own goals. The present study examines the relationship between social capital and individualism/collectivism using a measure that distinguishes between familism and institutional collectivism. Familism correlated negatively with social capital, whereas institutional collectivism practices exhibited positive associations with social capital, especially with trust and participation in voluntary organizations such as church or religious organizations and labor unions. It is concluded that in societies where trust is limited to the nuclear family or kinship alone, people have lower levels of social capital. Social capital increases as the radius of trust widens to encompass a larger number of people and social networks among whom norms of generalized reciprocity are operative.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-462
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

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collectivism
social capital
Institutional Practice
Organizations
Labor Unions
nuclear family
individualism
reciprocity
Nuclear Family
kinship
Social Support
social network
church
Social Capital
labor
citizen
participation
society

Keywords

  • Collectivism
  • Individualism
  • Radius of trust
  • Social capital

Cite this

Radius of trust : Social capital in relation to familism and institutional collectivism. / Realo, Anu; Allik, Jüri; Greenfield, Brenna.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 39, No. 4, 01.07.2008, p. 447-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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