Radio Galaxy Zoo: Observational evidence for environment as the cause of radio source asymmetry

P. E. Rodman, R. J. Turner, S. S. Shabala, J. K. Banfield, O. I. Wong, H. Andernach, A. F. Garon, A. D. Kapinska, R. P. Norris, L. Rudnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigate the role of environment on radio galaxy properties by constructing a sample of large (100 kpc), nearby (z < 0.3) radio sources identified as part of the Radio Galaxy Zoo citizen science project. Our sample consists of 16 Fanaroff-Riley Type II (FR-II) sources, 6 FR-I sources, and 1 source with a hybrid morphology. FR-I sources appear to be hosted by more massive galaxies, consistent with previous studies. In the FR-II sample, we compare the degree of asymmetry in radio lobe properties to asymmetry in the radio source environment, quantified through optical galaxy clustering. We find that the length of radio lobes in FR-II sources is anticorrelated with both galaxy clustering and lobe luminosity. These results are in quantitative agreement with predictions from radio source dynamical models and suggest that galaxy clustering provides a useful proxy for the ambient gas density distribution encountered by the radio lobes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5625-5641
Number of pages17
JournalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume482
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

Funding Information:
PR thanks the University of Tasmania for a Dean’s Summer Re-seach Studentship. RT thanks the University of Tasmania for an Elite Research Scholarship and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) for a CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS) studentship. SS thanks the Australian Research Council for an Early Career Fellowship, DE130101399. HA has benefitted from grant DAIP #066/2018 of Universidad de Guanajuato. Partial support for the work of AFG and LR comes from grant AST-1714205 to the University of Minnesota from the U.S. National Science Foundation.

Funding Information:
PR thanks the University of Tasmania for a Dean’s Summer Re-seach Studentship. RT thanks the University of Tasmania for an Elite Research Scholarship and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) for a CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS) studentship. SS thanks the Australian Research Council for an Early Career Fellowship, DE130101399. HA has benefitted from grant DAIP #066/2018 of Universidad de Guanajuato. Partial support for the work of AFG and LR comes from grant AST-1714205 to the University of Minnesota from the U.S. National Science Foundation. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED), which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Funding for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Japanese Monbukagakusho, and the Max Planck Society. The SDSS web site is http://www.sdss.org/. The SDSS is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) for the Participating Institutions. The Participating Institutions are The University of Chicago, Fermilab, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Japan Participation Group, The Johns Hopkins University, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), the Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics (MPA), New Mexico State University, University of Pittsburgh, Princeton University, the United States Naval Observatory, and the University of Washington. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 11 000 volunteers in the Radio Galaxy Zoo project. The data in this paper are the results of the efforts of the Radio Galaxy Zoo volunteers, without whom none of this work would be possible. Their efforts are individually acknowledged at http://rgzauthors.galaxyzoo.org.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Galaxies: active
  • Galaxies: jets
  • Radio continuum: galaxies

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