Racism, parent support, and math-based career interests, efficacy, and outcome expectations among african american adolescents

Annette E. Alliman-Brissett, Sherri L. Turner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using an extended model of social cognitive career theory, this study investigated ways in which African American middle school adolescents perceive racism and the associations among various aspects of perceptions of racism, other background factors, and math-based career interests, efficacy, and outcome expectations. Results indicated that African American adolescents clearly delineated among various types of interpersonal and institutional racism. Results also showed that various types of perceived racism were negatively associated with math efficacy and outcome expectations but positively associated with math and science interests. Greater interests in math were negatively related to poor academic performance, which in turn was negatively related to lack of peer support. Math outcome expectations was positively related to math efficacy and parent support. Adolescents who had lower academic performance also received greater parental support. The authors suggest that perceptions of racism be included as a factor in studies that examine the development of math/science interests among African American middle school adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-225
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Black Psychology
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • African American
  • Career development
  • Math interests
  • Parent support
  • Peer support
  • Racism

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