Racial/ethnic group comparisons of quit ratios and prevalences of cessation-related factors among adults who smoke with a quit attempt

Dana Mowls Carroll, Ashley Cole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Smoking-related disparities exist among racial/ethnic minoritized groups. Objective: We compared quit ratios and smoking cessation-related protective and risk factors by race/ethnicity to inform approaches to reduce disparities. Methods: Among adults who smoke with a quit attempt from Wave 4 (2016–2017) Population Assessment of Tobacco Use and Health Study, the following factors were examined by racial/ethnic group (American Indians/Alaska Native [AI/AN;n = 165], Black/African American [AA;n = 526], Asian [n = 38], Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Spanish [n = 475], or White [n = 1,960]), wherein each were nearly gender-balanced: cessation medications, counseling/self-help materials, home smoking ban, social support, e-cigarette use, sleep, and mental health. Results: Quit ratio was lower for AI/AN (adjusted odds ratio[aOR]:0.61) and Black/AA (aOR:0.49) and higher for Asian (aOR:1.90) and Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Spanish (aOR:1.30) than White adults. Medication use was low among all and lower among Black/AA (aOR:0.70) and Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Spanish (aOR:0.56) than White adults. Use of counseling/self-help materials were low among all and higher in AI/AN (aOR:1.85), Black/AA (aOR:1.87), and Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Spanish (aOR:1.49) than White adults. Presence of a smoking ban was lower among Black/AA (aOR:0.40) and higher in Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Spanish (aOR:1.59) than White adults. E-cigarette use was lower in Black/AA (aOR:0.53) and Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Spanish (aOR:0.43) than White adults. Sadness, anxiety, and sleep difficulties were higher in AI/AN (aORs:1.57, 1.50, 1.64) than White adults. Conclusions: All racial/ethnic groups would benefit from policies and programs that increase cessation medications and counseling. Quit ratios were particularly low among Black/AA and AI/AN adults. Black/AA adults may benefit from efforts to increase smoking bans, while AI/AN adults may benefit from cessation approaches that simultaneously target sleep and mental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-68
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute On Minority Health And Health Disparities and the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers [K01MD014795, R01CA221819-01A1S1, and P20CA253255-01]. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • American Indian/Alaska Native persons; health disparities; tobacco use; cessation

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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