Racial Differences in Household and Family Structure at the Turn of the Century

S. Philip Morgan, Antonio McDaniel, Andrew T. Miller, Samuel H. Preston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using recently available data drawn from the 1910 census manuscripts, this article documents sharp racial differences in family and household structure at the turn of the century. Compared with those of native whites, African-American households were less likely to be nuclear and more likely to be headed by women. Further, African-American women were much more likely than white women to have surviving children who were not living with them at the time of the census. Because such historical differences parallel contemporary ones, the authors call for greater attention to persistent structural, cultural, and demographic factors that affect racial different in family structure.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)799-828
Number of pages30
JournalAmerican Journal of Sociology
Volume98
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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