Race/ethnic and sex differences in large and small artery elasticity - Results of the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA)

Daniel A. Duprez, David R. Jacobs, Pamela L. Lutsey, David Herrington, Darryl Prime, Pamela Ouyang, R. Graham Barr, David A. Bluemke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Reduction in arterial elasticity marks progression toward cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Variability in arterial elasticity may help account for race/ethnic and gender differences in cardiovascular risk. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Whites, African Americans, Hispanics and Chinese aged 45-84 years free of clinically recognized cardiovascular disease were recruited in six US communities. Participants: We examined 3,316 women and 3,020 men according to race/ethnicity and sex. Main Outcome Measures: Large (LAE) and small artery (SAE) elasticity, derived from radial artery diastolic pulse wave contour registration in all subjects in a supine position using tonometry. LAE and SAE were adjusted for ethnicity, age, clinical site, height, heart rate, blood pressure, antihypertensive medication and body mass index, diabetes, smoking, and circulating lipids. Results: Much of the sex difference in arterial elasticity was explained by height. After adjustment, LAE did not differ by race/ ethnicity, but mean SAE in African Americans was 4.2 mL/mm Hg x 100 and 4.4 mL/ mm Hg x 100 in Hispanics compared to means of 4.6 mL/mm Hg x 100 in Whites, and 4.8 mL/mm Hg x 100 in Chinese. Conclusions: Reduced SAE may indicate earlier vascular disease in African Americans and Hispanics than other groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-250
Number of pages8
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume19
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

Keywords

  • Arterial elasticity
  • Blood pressure
  • MESA study

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Race/ethnic and sex differences in large and small artery elasticity - Results of the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this