Quantity versus quality: Keys to adoptive cell therapy success in breast cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

Over decades, reports of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes inducing partial and even complete responses in treatment-refractory tumors has spurred investigation into methods for refining and improving this process. Zacharias et al.1 report two partial and one complete response from a phase II study utilizing neoantigen-reactive TILs in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-222
Number of pages3
JournalMed
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 8 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
E.L. is principal investigator of the clinical trial “A Phase I/II Trial in Patients with Metastatic Gastrointestinal Epithelial Cancer Administering Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in which the Gene Encoding CISH was Inactivated Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System” ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT04426669 ). This trial is sponsored and funded by Intima Bioscience.

Funding Information:
The author is grateful to Modassir Choudhry, MD; Alessandro Riva, MD; Beau Webber, PhD; Branden Moriarty, PhD; and Timothy Starr, PhD, for helpful discussions in the field and critique of this article. E.L. reports research grants from the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR-Novocure Tumor-Treating Fields Research Award) and the Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance ; honoraria and travel expenses for lab-based research talks, and equipment for laboratory-based research, Novocure, LLC, 2018-present; honorarium for panel discussion organized by Antidote Education for a CME module on diagnostics and treatment of HER2+ gastric and colorectal cancers, funded by Daiichi-Sankyo , 2021 (honorarium donated to lab); consultant, Nomocan Pharmaceuticals (unpaid); Scientific Advisory Board Member, Minnetronix, LLC, 2018-present (unpaid); consultant and speaker honorarium, Boston Scientific US, 2019; institutional principal investigator for clinical trials sponsored by Celgene, Novocure, Intima Bioscience, and the National Cancer Institute ; and University of Minnesota membership in the Caris Life Sciences Precision Oncology Alliance (unpaid).

Funding Information:
The author is grateful to Modassir Choudhry, MD; Alessandro Riva, MD; Beau Webber, PhD; Branden Moriarty, PhD; and Timothy Starr, PhD, for helpful discussions in the field and critique of this article. E.L. reports research grants from the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR-Novocure Tumor-Treating Fields Research Award) and the Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance; honoraria and travel expenses for lab-based research talks, and equipment for laboratory-based research, Novocure, LLC, 2018-present; honorarium for panel discussion organized by Antidote Education for a CME module on diagnostics and treatment of HER2+ gastric and colorectal cancers, funded by Daiichi-Sankyo, 2021 (honorarium donated to lab); consultant, Nomocan Pharmaceuticals (unpaid); Scientific Advisory Board Member, Minnetronix, LLC, 2018-present (unpaid); consultant and speaker honorarium, Boston Scientific US, 2019; institutional principal investigator for clinical trials sponsored by Celgene, Novocure, Intima Bioscience, and the National Cancer Institute; and University of Minnesota membership in the Caris Life Sciences Precision Oncology Alliance (unpaid). E.L. is principal investigator of the clinical trial “A Phase I/II Trial in Patients with Metastatic Gastrointestinal Epithelial Cancer Administering Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in which the Gene Encoding CISH was Inactivated Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System” (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT04426669). This trial is sponsored and funded by Intima Bioscience.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Elsevier Inc.

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