Quantitation of DNA Adducts Resulting from Acrolein Exposure and Lipid Peroxidation in Oral Cells of Cigarette Smokers from Three Racial/Ethnic Groups with Differing Risks for Lung Cancer

Sungshim L. Park, Loic Le Marchand, Guang Cheng, Silvia Balbo, Menglan Chen, Steven G. Carmella, Nicole M. Thomson, Younghan Lee, Yesha M. Patel, Daniel O. Stram, Joni Jensen, Dorothy K. Hatsukami, Sharon E. Murphy, Stephen S. Hecht

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Multiethnic Cohort Study has demonstrated that the risk for lung cancer in cigarette smokers among three ethnic groups is highest in Native Hawaiians, intermediate in Whites, and lowest in Japanese Americans. We hypothesized that differences in levels of DNA adducts in oral cells of cigarette smokers would be related to these differing risks of lung cancer. Therefore, we used liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry to quantify the acrolein-DNA adduct (8R/S)-3-(2′-deoxyribos-1′-yl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-8-hydroxypyrimido[1,2-a]purine-10(3H)-one (?-OH-Acr-dGuo, 1) and the lipid peroxidation-related DNA adduct 1,N6-etheno-dAdo (ϵdAdo, 2) in DNA obtained by oral rinse from 101 Native Hawaiians, 101 Whites, and 79 Japanese Americans. Levels of urinary biomarkers of nicotine, acrolein, acrylonitrile, and a mixture of crotonaldehyde, methyl vinyl ketone, and methacrolein were also quantified. Whites had significantly higher levels of ?-OH-Acr-dGuo than Japanese Americans and Native Hawaiians after adjusting for age and sex. There was no significant difference in levels of this DNA adduct between Japanese Americans and Native Hawaiians, which is not consistent with the high lung cancer risk of Native Hawaiians. Levels of ϵdAdo were modestly higher in Whites and Native Hawaiians than in Japanese Americans. The lower level of DNA adducts in the oral cells of Japanese American cigarette smokers than Whites is consistent with their lower risk for lung cancer. The higher levels of ϵdAdo, but not ?-OH-Acr-dGuo, in Native Hawaiian versus Japanese American cigarette smokers suggest that lipid peroxidation and related processes may be involved in their high risk for lung cancer, but further studies are required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1914-1922
Number of pages9
JournalChemical research in toxicology
Volume35
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 17 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was funded by Grant No. P01-CA-138338 from the National Cancer Institute. Mass spectrometry was carried out in the Analytical Biochemistry Shared Resource of the Masonic Cancer Center, supported in part by Cancer Center Support Grant No. CA-077598. Salary support for the Head of the Shared Resource, Dr. Peter Villalta, was provided by National Cancer Institute Grant No. R50-CA-211256.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 American Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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