Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics

Shaoqing Liu, Qianlai Zhuang, Min Chen, Lianhong Gu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Current terrestrial ecosystem models are usually driven with global average annual atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration data at the global scale. However, high-precision CO2 measurement from eddy flux towers showed that seasonal, spatial surface atmospheric CO2 concentration differences were as large as 35 ppmv and the site-level tests indicated that the CO2 variation exhibited different effects on plant photosynthesis. Here we used a process-based ecosystem model driven with two spatially and temporally explicit CO2 data sets to analyze the atmospheric CO2 fertilization effects on the global carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems from 2003 to 2010. Our results demonstrated that CO2 seasonal variation had a negative effect on plant carbon assimilation, while CO2 spatial variation exhibited a positive impact. When both CO2 seasonal and spatial effects were considered, global gross primary production and net ecosystem production were 1.7 Pg C·yr-1 and 0.08 Pg C·yr-1 higher than the simulation using uniformly distributed CO2 data set and the difference was significant in tropical and temperate evergreen broadleaf forest regions. This study suggests that the CO2 observation network should be expanded so that the realistic CO2 variation can be incorporated into the land surface models to adequately account for CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere01391
JournalEcosphere
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2016

Keywords

  • Atmospheric CO
  • Carbon dynamics
  • Gross primary production
  • Net ecosystem production
  • Process-based ecosystem model

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