Quality of Higher Education and Sociopolitical Attitudes

David Knoke, Larry Isaac

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Attitude differences by quality of higher education experience were investigated on six sociopolitical issues for a national sample of adult Americans. Persons from high-ranked colleges were found to be consistently more liberal than those from low- and unranked institutions, differences which were significant on all but one item when region of birth and age were held constant. Most variance in attitudes by education lies between the three major educational strata (grade school, high school, and college), rather than within the college- educated group. But rising levels of higher education and greater differences among younger than older persons suggest a continuing stratification of opinion within the college-educated population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)707-708
Number of pages2
JournalSocial Forces
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1976

Fingerprint

education
social stratum
school grade
human being
school
experience
Education
Person
Group
High School

Cite this

Quality of Higher Education and Sociopolitical Attitudes. / Knoke, David; Isaac, Larry.

In: Social Forces, Vol. 54, No. 3, 03.1976, p. 707-708.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knoke, David ; Isaac, Larry. / Quality of Higher Education and Sociopolitical Attitudes. In: Social Forces. 1976 ; Vol. 54, No. 3. pp. 707-708.
@article{907a2b01930a4b16889ea6222aac5567,
title = "Quality of Higher Education and Sociopolitical Attitudes",
abstract = "Attitude differences by quality of higher education experience were investigated on six sociopolitical issues for a national sample of adult Americans. Persons from high-ranked colleges were found to be consistently more liberal than those from low- and unranked institutions, differences which were significant on all but one item when region of birth and age were held constant. Most variance in attitudes by education lies between the three major educational strata (grade school, high school, and college), rather than within the college- educated group. But rising levels of higher education and greater differences among younger than older persons suggest a continuing stratification of opinion within the college-educated population.",
author = "David Knoke and Larry Isaac",
year = "1976",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1093/sf/54.3.524",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "707--708",
journal = "Social Forces",
issn = "0037-7732",
publisher = "University of North Carolina Press",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality of Higher Education and Sociopolitical Attitudes

AU - Knoke, David

AU - Isaac, Larry

PY - 1976/3

Y1 - 1976/3

N2 - Attitude differences by quality of higher education experience were investigated on six sociopolitical issues for a national sample of adult Americans. Persons from high-ranked colleges were found to be consistently more liberal than those from low- and unranked institutions, differences which were significant on all but one item when region of birth and age were held constant. Most variance in attitudes by education lies between the three major educational strata (grade school, high school, and college), rather than within the college- educated group. But rising levels of higher education and greater differences among younger than older persons suggest a continuing stratification of opinion within the college-educated population.

AB - Attitude differences by quality of higher education experience were investigated on six sociopolitical issues for a national sample of adult Americans. Persons from high-ranked colleges were found to be consistently more liberal than those from low- and unranked institutions, differences which were significant on all but one item when region of birth and age were held constant. Most variance in attitudes by education lies between the three major educational strata (grade school, high school, and college), rather than within the college- educated group. But rising levels of higher education and greater differences among younger than older persons suggest a continuing stratification of opinion within the college-educated population.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925900474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925900474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/sf/54.3.524

DO - 10.1093/sf/54.3.524

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84925900474

VL - 54

SP - 707

EP - 708

JO - Social Forces

JF - Social Forces

SN - 0037-7732

IS - 3

ER -