Pyridoxine is not effective to prevent hand-foot syndrome associated with capecitabine therapy: Results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

Yoon Koo Kang, Sung Sook Lee, Dok Hyun Yoon, So Young Lee, Young Ju Chun, Min Sun Kim, Min Hee Ryu, Heung Moon Chang, Jae Lyun Lee, Tae Won Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether concurrent pyridoxine therapy can prevent the development of hand-foot syndrome (HFS) in patients being treated with capecitabine. Methods: Chemotherapy-naive patients with GI tract cancers scheduled for capecitabine-containing chemotherapy were randomly assigned to concurrent oral pyridoxine (200 mg/d) or placebo. Patients were stratified by chemotherapy regimen and monitored until development of National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria grade 2 or worse HFS or capecitabine- containing chemotherapy ended. Patients in the placebo group who developed grade 2 or worse HFS were randomly assigned again to receive pyridoxine or placebo in the next chemotherapy cycle to determine whether pyridoxine could improve HFS. Results: The median number of chemotherapy cycles to grade 2 or worse HFS was three in both groups. Grade 2 or worse HFS developed in 55 (30.6%) of 180 placebo-treated patients and in 57 (31.7%) of 180 pyridoxine patients. The cumulative dose of capecitabine to grade 2 or worse HFS was not different between the two groups (median not reached in either group; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.95; P = .788). Randomization of the 44 patients in the placebo group with grade 2 or worse HFS to placebo or pyridoxine for the next cycle resulted in no significant difference in the proportion showing improvement of HFS (42.9% v 47.8%; HR = 1.12; P = .94). By multivariate analysis, age ≥ 56 years (HR = 1.768; 95% CI, 1.190 to 2.628; P = .005) was an independent risk factor for grade 2 or worse HFS, and combined use of docetaxel (HR = 2.046; 95% CI, 0.880 to 4.755; P = .096) was of borderline significance. Conclusion: Pyridoxine is not effective in prevention of capecitabine-associated HFS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3824-3829
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume28
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 20 2010

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