Public responses to COVID-19 information from the public health office on Twitter and YouTube: implications for research practice

Jaigris Hodson, George Veletsianos, Shandell Houlden

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We collected tweets directed at the official Twitter account of the Canadian Public Health Office as well as comments on a Canadian Public Health Office press conference posted to YouTube. We used a mixed method corpus-assisted discourse analysis approach to categorize and analyze these data. We found key differences between comments on each platform, namely differences in tone and sarcasm in YouTube comments, and more balance in Twitter mentions. Findings suggest that studying public responses to health information on one platform in isolation does not provide an accurate picture. To generate a fuller picture of misinformation, researchers should conduct studies across digital platforms using diverse methods. This research could influence how studies of health communication and public opinion are approached in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)156-164
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Information Technology and Politics
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • interdisciplinary approaches
  • methods
  • public opinion
  • Social media
  • Twitter
  • YouTube

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