Psychosocial factors and cardiovascular diseases

Susan A. Everson-Rose, Tené T. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

457 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapidly accruing evidence from a diversity of disciplines supports the hypothesis that psychosocial factors are related to morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular diseases. We review relevant literature on (a) negative emotional states, including depression, anger and hostility, and anxiety; (b) chronic and acute psychosocial stressors; and (c) social ties, social support, and social conflict. All three of these psychosocial domains have been significantly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We also discuss critical pathophysiological mechanisms and pathways that likely operate in a synergistic and integrative way to promote atherogenesis and related clinical manifestations. We conclude by discussing some of the important challenges and opportunities for future investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-500
Number of pages32
JournalAnnual Review of Public Health
Volume26
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2005

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Cardiovascular Diseases
Psychology
Morbidity
Hostility
Mortality
Anger
Social Support
Atherosclerosis
Anxiety
Depression
Conflict (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Anger
  • Depression
  • Hostility
  • Pathophysiological mechanisms
  • Stress

Cite this

Psychosocial factors and cardiovascular diseases. / Everson-Rose, Susan A.; Lewis, Tené T.

In: Annual Review of Public Health, Vol. 26, 02.05.2005, p. 469-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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