Psychosocial Correlates of Experience and Intention to Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Cross-Sectional Study Among East African Men in the U.S.

Motohiro Nakajima, Abdifatah Haji, Abdul Sero, Sartu Taha, Hileena Habte, Shamso Jama, James Hodges, Sakhaudiin Mohamud, Osman Ahmed, Obsa Hassan, Mustafa al’Absi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cancer screening is an important approach to reducing disease burden. The rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among immigrants in the U.S. is very low. Our study’s aim was to examine correlates of experience with, and intention to, receive CRC screening among East African men who were up-to-date (UTD) with CRC screening (n = 64, mean age 65) and those who had never been screened or were overdue for one (NOD; n = 47, mean age 60), compared on demographic characteristics, attitudes toward cancer, psychosocial stress, and health behaviors. UTD men had significantly less emotional concerns about cancer screening and experienced significantly greater distress and lower resiliency than NOD men. However, these results were attenuated after controlling for demographic confounders. Perceived risk, trust in the medical system, and PTSD symptoms were significantly associated with an intention to undertake CRC screening in the next 12 months. These results should be used to guide efforts toward increasing CRC screening rates among immigrant communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-623
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Primary Prevention
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by the Center for Healthy African American Men through Partnerships (CHAAMPS) U54MD008620. We would like to thank Jemal Tufe, Girma Hassan, Oromo Community of Minnesota, Abdusamed Yousuf, Robert Albee, and Sharon Albee, Sahra A Ali, and Sahra H Ali for their assistance with community outreach and addressing logistical issues. Author MN and MA designed the study. OA and OH provided guidance related to community outreach and logistics. AH, AS, ST, HH, SJ, and SM reached out to Somali and Ethiopian communities and led efforts on recruitment of study participants. JH assisted with data management and analysis plans. MN managed data and conducted statistical analysis. MN, JH, and MA were involved in data interpretation additional analyses. MN developed the first draft of the manuscript. All authors read and edited the draft as well as agreed on the final version.

Funding Information:
This study was supported by the Center for Healthy African American Men through Partnerships (CHAAMPS) U54MD008620. We would like to thank Jemal Tufe, Girma Hassan, Oromo Community of Minnesota, Abdusamed Yousuf, Robert Albee, and Sharon Albee,?Sahra A Ali, and Sahra H Ali for their assistance with community outreach and addressing logistical issues. Author MN and MA designed the study. OA and OH provided guidance related to community outreach and logistics. AH, AS, ST, HH, SJ, and SM reached out to Somali and Ethiopian communities and led efforts on recruitment of study participants. JH assisted with data management and analysis plans. MN managed data and conducted statistical analysis. MN, JH, and MA were involved in data interpretation additional analyses. MN developed the first draft of the manuscript. All authors read and edited the draft as well as agreed on the final version.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • African American
  • Colorectal cancer screening
  • East African
  • Health disparity
  • Immigrants

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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