Psychometric evaluation and calibration of health-related quality of life item banks: Plans for the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)

Bryce B. Reeve, Ron D. Hays, Jakob B. Bjorner, Karon F. Cook, Paul K. Crane, Jeanne A. Teresi, David Thissen, Dennis A. Revicki, David J. Weiss, Ronald K. Hambleton, Honghu Liu, Richard Gershon, Steven P. Reise, Jin Shei Lai, David Cella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

906 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: The construction and evaluation of item banks to measure unidimensional constructs of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is a fundamental objective of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) project. OBJECTIVES:: Item banks will be used as the foundation for developing short-form instruments and enabling computerized adaptive testing. The PROMIS Steering Committee selected 5 HRQOL domains for initial focus: physical functioning, fatigue, pain, emotional distress, and social role participation. This report provides an overview of the methods used in the PROMIS item analyses and proposed calibration of item banks. ANALYSES:: Analyses include evaluation of data quality (eg, logic and range checking, spread of response distribution within an item), descriptive statistics (eg, frequencies, means), item response theory model assumptions (unidimensionality, local independence, monotonicity), model fit, differential item functioning, and item calibration for banking. RECOMMENDATIONS:: Summarized are key analytic issues; recommendations are provided for future evaluations of item banks in HRQOL assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S22-S31
JournalMedical care
Volume45
Issue number5 SUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Keywords

  • Computerized adaptive testing
  • Differential item functioning
  • Item response theory
  • Model fit
  • Unidimensionality

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Psychometric evaluation and calibration of health-related quality of life item banks: Plans for the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this