Psychological well-being in midlife following early childhood intervention

Christina F. Mondi, Arthur J. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study is the first to examine the relations between participation in a public early childhood intervention (the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program) and psychological well-being (or, positive functioning) into early mid-life. Data are drawn from the Chicago Longitudinal Study (CLS), which has followed a cohort of 1,539 individuals who grew up in urban poverty for over four decades. Approximately two-thirds of the original study cohort participated in the CPC program in early childhood; the rest comprise a demographically matched comparison group. Participants’ psychological functioning at age 35–37 was assessed using the Ryff Scales of Psychological Wellbeing. Results support a positive relationship between CPC preschool participation and long-term psychological wellbeing. Moderated mediation (e.g., whether CPC effects on wellbeing differ across subgroups) and potential mechanisms across multiple social-ecological levels (according to the 5-Hypothesis Model of early intervention) are also empirically investigated. Future directions for child development research, early childhood intervention, and public policy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopment and psychopathology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Data collection was supported by NICHD grant R01HD034294-24. The first author’s work was funded by a Doris Duke Fellowship for the Promotion of Child Well-Being. The views and findings presented herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Doris Duke Fellowship.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

Keywords

  • early childhood education
  • mechanisms of early intervention
  • poverty
  • preschool
  • psychological wellbeing

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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