Providing calorie information on fast-food restaurant menu boards: Consumer views

Rebecca C. Fitch, Lisa J. Harnack, Dianne R. Neumark-Sztainer, Mary T. Story, Simone A. French, J. Michael Oakes, Sarah A. Rydell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To gather consumer input about approaches to providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus. Design. We asked a subset of individuals (n = 150) in an experimental study about the influence of nutrition labeling on fast-food meal choices to evaluate calorie information on mock fast-food menus in various formats. Setting. Three community sites in the Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, metropolitan area. Subjects. Adolescents and adults who ate fast food at least once per week were recruited. Measures. Via a series of open- and close-ended questions, participants gave feedback about several formats for providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus. Analysis. Means and frequencies were calculated, and X2 tests were conducted. Results. When asked to compare a menu that provided calorie information for each menu item with a menu that provided the number of minutes of running that would be required to burn the calories contained in each menu item, 71.0% of participants preferred the calorie information over the physical activity information. Participants also compared two approaches to providing caloric reference information on the menu (average daily calorie needs per day vs. per meal), and 61.3% preferred the calorie needs-per-meal format. Conclusion. Our results may be useful in designing approaches to providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-132
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

Fingerprint

Fast Foods
Restaurants
food
Meals
meals
Food
Food Labeling
energy
Running
Exercise
nutrition
agglomeration area
adolescent

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Calorie information
  • Fast-Food restaurants
  • Health focus: Nutrition
  • Nutrition labeling
  • Outcome measure: Cognitive
  • Prevention research. Manuscript format: Research
  • Purpose: Evaluation
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Setting: Community
  • Strategy: Education
  • Target population age: Youth
  • Target population circumstances: Education/income level

Cite this

Providing calorie information on fast-food restaurant menu boards : Consumer views. / Fitch, Rebecca C.; Harnack, Lisa J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne R.; Story, Mary T.; French, Simone A.; Oakes, J. Michael; Rydell, Sarah A.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.11.2009, p. 129-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1ed070ecc54c404eb04f46d5d7d0d92f,
title = "Providing calorie information on fast-food restaurant menu boards: Consumer views",
abstract = "Purpose. To gather consumer input about approaches to providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus. Design. We asked a subset of individuals (n = 150) in an experimental study about the influence of nutrition labeling on fast-food meal choices to evaluate calorie information on mock fast-food menus in various formats. Setting. Three community sites in the Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, metropolitan area. Subjects. Adolescents and adults who ate fast food at least once per week were recruited. Measures. Via a series of open- and close-ended questions, participants gave feedback about several formats for providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus. Analysis. Means and frequencies were calculated, and X2 tests were conducted. Results. When asked to compare a menu that provided calorie information for each menu item with a menu that provided the number of minutes of running that would be required to burn the calories contained in each menu item, 71.0{\%} of participants preferred the calorie information over the physical activity information. Participants also compared two approaches to providing caloric reference information on the menu (average daily calorie needs per day vs. per meal), and 61.3{\%} preferred the calorie needs-per-meal format. Conclusion. Our results may be useful in designing approaches to providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus.",
keywords = "Adults, Calorie information, Fast-Food restaurants, Health focus: Nutrition, Nutrition labeling, Outcome measure: Cognitive, Prevention research. Manuscript format: Research, Purpose: Evaluation, Race/ethnicity, Setting: Community, Strategy: Education, Target population age: Youth, Target population circumstances: Education/income level",
author = "Fitch, {Rebecca C.} and Harnack, {Lisa J.} and Neumark-Sztainer, {Dianne R.} and Story, {Mary T.} and French, {Simone A.} and Oakes, {J. Michael} and Rydell, {Sarah A.}",
year = "2009",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4278/ajhp.08031426",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "129--132",
journal = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
issn = "0890-1171",
publisher = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Providing calorie information on fast-food restaurant menu boards

T2 - Consumer views

AU - Fitch, Rebecca C.

AU - Harnack, Lisa J.

AU - Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne R.

AU - Story, Mary T.

AU - French, Simone A.

AU - Oakes, J. Michael

AU - Rydell, Sarah A.

PY - 2009/11/1

Y1 - 2009/11/1

N2 - Purpose. To gather consumer input about approaches to providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus. Design. We asked a subset of individuals (n = 150) in an experimental study about the influence of nutrition labeling on fast-food meal choices to evaluate calorie information on mock fast-food menus in various formats. Setting. Three community sites in the Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, metropolitan area. Subjects. Adolescents and adults who ate fast food at least once per week were recruited. Measures. Via a series of open- and close-ended questions, participants gave feedback about several formats for providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus. Analysis. Means and frequencies were calculated, and X2 tests were conducted. Results. When asked to compare a menu that provided calorie information for each menu item with a menu that provided the number of minutes of running that would be required to burn the calories contained in each menu item, 71.0% of participants preferred the calorie information over the physical activity information. Participants also compared two approaches to providing caloric reference information on the menu (average daily calorie needs per day vs. per meal), and 61.3% preferred the calorie needs-per-meal format. Conclusion. Our results may be useful in designing approaches to providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus.

AB - Purpose. To gather consumer input about approaches to providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus. Design. We asked a subset of individuals (n = 150) in an experimental study about the influence of nutrition labeling on fast-food meal choices to evaluate calorie information on mock fast-food menus in various formats. Setting. Three community sites in the Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, metropolitan area. Subjects. Adolescents and adults who ate fast food at least once per week were recruited. Measures. Via a series of open- and close-ended questions, participants gave feedback about several formats for providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus. Analysis. Means and frequencies were calculated, and X2 tests were conducted. Results. When asked to compare a menu that provided calorie information for each menu item with a menu that provided the number of minutes of running that would be required to burn the calories contained in each menu item, 71.0% of participants preferred the calorie information over the physical activity information. Participants also compared two approaches to providing caloric reference information on the menu (average daily calorie needs per day vs. per meal), and 61.3% preferred the calorie needs-per-meal format. Conclusion. Our results may be useful in designing approaches to providing energy composition information for foods on fast-food restaurant menus.

KW - Adults

KW - Calorie information

KW - Fast-Food restaurants

KW - Health focus: Nutrition

KW - Nutrition labeling

KW - Outcome measure: Cognitive

KW - Prevention research. Manuscript format: Research

KW - Purpose: Evaluation

KW - Race/ethnicity

KW - Setting: Community

KW - Strategy: Education

KW - Target population age: Youth

KW - Target population circumstances: Education/income level

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=73349096927&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=73349096927&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4278/ajhp.08031426

DO - 10.4278/ajhp.08031426

M3 - Article

C2 - 19928485

AN - SCOPUS:73349096927

VL - 24

SP - 129

EP - 132

JO - American Journal of Health Promotion

JF - American Journal of Health Promotion

SN - 0890-1171

IS - 2

ER -