Protective effect of a marine oligopeptide preparation from chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) on radiation-induced immune suppression in mice

Ruiyue Yang, Xinrong Pei, Junbo Wang, Zhaofeng Zhang, Haifeng Zhao, Qiong Li, Ming Zhao, Yong Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A marine oligopeptide preparation (MOP) obtained from Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) by the method of enzymatic hydrolysis, has been found to enhance the innate and adaptive immunities through stimulation of the secretion of cytokines in mice. The current study aimed to further investigate the protective effect of MOP on radiation-induced immune suppression in mice. RESULTS: Female ICR mice (6-8 weeks old) were randomly divided into three groups, i.e. blank control, irradiation control and MOP(1.350 g kg& body weight) plus irradiation-treated group. MOP significantly increased the survival rate and prolonged the survival times for 30 days after irradiation, and lessened the radiation-induced suppression of T- or B-lymphocyte proliferation, resulting in the recovery of cell-mediated and humoral immune functions. This effect may be produced by augmentation of the relative numbers of radioresistant CD4+ T cells, enhancement of the level of immunostimulatory cytokine, IL-12, reduction of the level of total cellular NF-κB through the induction of IκB in spleen and inhibition of the apoptosis of splenocytes. CONCLUSION: We propose that MOP be used as an ideal adjuvant therapy to alleviate radiation-induced injuries in cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2241-2248
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Volume90
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Keywords

  • Bioactive peptide
  • Cytokine
  • Immunosuppression
  • Nuclear factorb
  • Radioprotective
  • T-cell subpopulation

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