Prostatic disorders in the dog

S. D. Johnston, K. Kamolpatana, M. V. Root-Kustritz, G. R. Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Common canine prostatic disorders include benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), prostatitis, prostatic cysts and prostatic adenocarcinoma. BPH is a spontaneous and age-related disorder of intact male dogs, which occurs in more than 80% male dogs over 5 years of age, and which is associated with clinical signs of sanguinous prostatic fluid, constipation and dysuria. BPH signs respond to castration or to finasteride treatment (0.1-0.5 mg/kg per os once daily), as finasteride inhibits conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, causing prostatic involution via apoptosis. BPH often occurs concurrently with prostatic infection, abscessation, cysts and neoplasia in the intact dog, and finasteride-induced prostatic involution may be beneficial in treatment of all of these conditions except neoplasia. Two studies suggest that risk of prostatic adenocarcinoma is increased in neutered, compared to intact male dogs. Although canine prostatic neoplasia, unlike human prostatic neoplasia, usually does not respond to androgen deprivation, recent reports of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in a high percentage of older male dogs, with and without prostatic adenocarcinoma, suggests that PIN may be a precursor to adenocarcinoma in the dog as it is believed to be in man. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-415
Number of pages11
JournalAnimal reproduction science
Volume60-61
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2000

Fingerprint

Prostatic Hyperplasia
Dogs
Finasteride
dogs
Adenocarcinoma
adenocarcinoma
hypertrophy
Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia
neoplasms
Canidae
Cysts
Neoplasms
Dysuria
Prostatitis
Dihydrotestosterone
prostatitis
Castration
Constipation
constipation
Androgens

Keywords

  • Canine prostatic hypertrophy
  • Canine prostatic neoplasia
  • Canine prostatitis
  • Finasteride

Cite this

Prostatic disorders in the dog. / Johnston, S. D.; Kamolpatana, K.; Root-Kustritz, M. V.; Johnston, G. R.

In: Animal reproduction science, Vol. 60-61, 02.07.2000, p. 405-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnston, SD, Kamolpatana, K, Root-Kustritz, MV & Johnston, GR 2000, 'Prostatic disorders in the dog', Animal reproduction science, vol. 60-61, pp. 405-415. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-4320(00)00101-9
Johnston, S. D. ; Kamolpatana, K. ; Root-Kustritz, M. V. ; Johnston, G. R. / Prostatic disorders in the dog. In: Animal reproduction science. 2000 ; Vol. 60-61. pp. 405-415.
@article{6eef99ae02b44a3aac280a6e470a4824,
title = "Prostatic disorders in the dog",
abstract = "Common canine prostatic disorders include benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), prostatitis, prostatic cysts and prostatic adenocarcinoma. BPH is a spontaneous and age-related disorder of intact male dogs, which occurs in more than 80{\%} male dogs over 5 years of age, and which is associated with clinical signs of sanguinous prostatic fluid, constipation and dysuria. BPH signs respond to castration or to finasteride treatment (0.1-0.5 mg/kg per os once daily), as finasteride inhibits conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, causing prostatic involution via apoptosis. BPH often occurs concurrently with prostatic infection, abscessation, cysts and neoplasia in the intact dog, and finasteride-induced prostatic involution may be beneficial in treatment of all of these conditions except neoplasia. Two studies suggest that risk of prostatic adenocarcinoma is increased in neutered, compared to intact male dogs. Although canine prostatic neoplasia, unlike human prostatic neoplasia, usually does not respond to androgen deprivation, recent reports of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in a high percentage of older male dogs, with and without prostatic adenocarcinoma, suggests that PIN may be a precursor to adenocarcinoma in the dog as it is believed to be in man. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.",
keywords = "Canine prostatic hypertrophy, Canine prostatic neoplasia, Canine prostatitis, Finasteride",
author = "Johnston, {S. D.} and K. Kamolpatana and Root-Kustritz, {M. V.} and Johnston, {G. R.}",
year = "2000",
month = "7",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1016/S0378-4320(00)00101-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60-61",
pages = "405--415",
journal = "Animal Reproduction Science",
issn = "0378-4320",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prostatic disorders in the dog

AU - Johnston, S. D.

AU - Kamolpatana, K.

AU - Root-Kustritz, M. V.

AU - Johnston, G. R.

PY - 2000/7/2

Y1 - 2000/7/2

N2 - Common canine prostatic disorders include benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), prostatitis, prostatic cysts and prostatic adenocarcinoma. BPH is a spontaneous and age-related disorder of intact male dogs, which occurs in more than 80% male dogs over 5 years of age, and which is associated with clinical signs of sanguinous prostatic fluid, constipation and dysuria. BPH signs respond to castration or to finasteride treatment (0.1-0.5 mg/kg per os once daily), as finasteride inhibits conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, causing prostatic involution via apoptosis. BPH often occurs concurrently with prostatic infection, abscessation, cysts and neoplasia in the intact dog, and finasteride-induced prostatic involution may be beneficial in treatment of all of these conditions except neoplasia. Two studies suggest that risk of prostatic adenocarcinoma is increased in neutered, compared to intact male dogs. Although canine prostatic neoplasia, unlike human prostatic neoplasia, usually does not respond to androgen deprivation, recent reports of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in a high percentage of older male dogs, with and without prostatic adenocarcinoma, suggests that PIN may be a precursor to adenocarcinoma in the dog as it is believed to be in man. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

AB - Common canine prostatic disorders include benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), prostatitis, prostatic cysts and prostatic adenocarcinoma. BPH is a spontaneous and age-related disorder of intact male dogs, which occurs in more than 80% male dogs over 5 years of age, and which is associated with clinical signs of sanguinous prostatic fluid, constipation and dysuria. BPH signs respond to castration or to finasteride treatment (0.1-0.5 mg/kg per os once daily), as finasteride inhibits conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, causing prostatic involution via apoptosis. BPH often occurs concurrently with prostatic infection, abscessation, cysts and neoplasia in the intact dog, and finasteride-induced prostatic involution may be beneficial in treatment of all of these conditions except neoplasia. Two studies suggest that risk of prostatic adenocarcinoma is increased in neutered, compared to intact male dogs. Although canine prostatic neoplasia, unlike human prostatic neoplasia, usually does not respond to androgen deprivation, recent reports of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in a high percentage of older male dogs, with and without prostatic adenocarcinoma, suggests that PIN may be a precursor to adenocarcinoma in the dog as it is believed to be in man. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

KW - Canine prostatic hypertrophy

KW - Canine prostatic neoplasia

KW - Canine prostatitis

KW - Finasteride

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034596091&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034596091&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0378-4320(00)00101-9

DO - 10.1016/S0378-4320(00)00101-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 10844211

AN - SCOPUS:0034596091

VL - 60-61

SP - 405

EP - 415

JO - Animal Reproduction Science

JF - Animal Reproduction Science

SN - 0378-4320

ER -