Prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics reconstitute the original human tumor in vivo. Gu G, Yuan J, Wills M, Kasper S, Department of Urologic Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center; Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt Children's Hospital; The Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN

Yingming Li, Kenneth S. Koeneman

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveypeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cancer may arise from a cancer stem/progenitor cell that shares characteristics with its normal counterpart. We report the reconstitution of the original human prostate cancer specimen from epithelial cell lines (termed HPET for human prostate epithelial/hTERT) derived from this sample. These tumors can be described in terms of Gleason score, a classification not applied to any of the transgenic mouse models currently developed to mimic human disease. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses indicate that they do not express androgen receptor or p63, similar to that reported for prostate stem cells. These cell lines also express embryonic stem markers (Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2) as well as early progenitor cell markers (CD44 and Nestin) in vitro. Clonally derived HPET cells reconstitute the original human tumor in vivo and differentiate into the three prostate epithelial cell lineages, indicating that they arise from a common stem/progenitor cell. Serial transplantation experiments reconstitute the tumors, suggesting that a fraction of parental or clonally derived HPET cells have self-renewal potential. Thus, this model may enhance our understanding of human tumor development and provide a mechanism for studying cancer stem/progenitor cells in differentiation, tumorigenesis, preclinical testing, and the development of drug resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalUrologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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