Propensity for resistance development in the invasive berry pest, spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), under laboratory selection

Carrie Deans, William D. Hutchison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Over the past 14 years, the invasive vinegar fly, spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), has become one of the most damaging fruit pests in the United States. With regional economic losses estimated as high as $500 million for moderate infestations, D. suzukii control represents an often-untenable cost to growers. Management relies heavily on chemical control, which may be applied up to nine times in one season. The widespread use of chemical controls has led to concerns about insecticide resistance, and resistant field populations have already been documented in California and Michigan.

RESULTS: We cultured sub-populations of three different Minnesota field populations of D. suzukii in the laboratory and exposed them to increasing concentrations of two commonly-used insecticides, zeta-cypermethrin (pyrethroid) and spinetoram (spinosyn). Over the exposure period, the sub-populations experienced an 8- to 45-fold increase in insecticide concentration. We saw significant increases in the median lethal concentration (LC 50 ) values of one sub-population exposed to zeta-cypermethrin and one exposed to spinetoram. Across the spinetoram exposures, we also observed significant reductions in the top mortality values for three different sub-populations.

CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that field populations of D. suzukii can develop resistance to zeta-cypermethrin and spinetoram in short periods of time under laboratory selection but that resistance to spinosyns occurs more readily than to pyrethroids. These results support other studies that have documented spinosyn resistance in field populations and in laboratory selections. Resistance evolution to spinosyns is a particularly important issue, as they represent one of few organic insecticide options for D. suzukii. © 2022 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5203-5212
Number of pages10
JournalPest management science
Volume78
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank Eric Burkness and Dominique Ebbenga for their assistance with fly colony maintenance and input on experimental design. This work was supported by funding from the Agricultural Growth, Research, and Innovation (AGRI) Crops Research Program, of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, St Paul, MN, USA (2018–2021), and the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN, USA. Grants were awarded to WH.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

Keywords

  • LC
  • dose–response
  • insecticide
  • pyrethroid
  • spinosyn
  • vinegar fly
  • Animals
  • Fruit
  • Drosophila
  • Insecticides
  • Insect Control/methods

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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