Prone Positioning of Patients With Coronavirus Disease 2019 Who Are Nonintubated in Hypoxic Respiratory Distress: Single-Site Retrospective Health Records Review

Christine Wendt, Kristi Mobus, Dan Weiner, Barnet Eskin, John R. Allegra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: In March and April 2020 of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, site clinical practice guidelines were implemented for prone positioning of patients with suspected coronavirus disease 2019 in hypoxic respiratory distress who are awake, alert, and spontaneously breathing. The purpose of this pandemic disaster practice improvement project was to measure changes in pulse oximetry associated with prone positioning of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 infection in adult acute respiratory distress or adult respiratory distress syndrome, who are awake, alert, spontaneously breathing, and nonintubated.

METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients who were coronavirus disease 2019 positive in the emergency department from March 30, 2020 to April 30, 2020 was conducted for patients with a room air pulse oximetry <90% and a preprone position pulse oximetry ≤94% who tolerated prone positioning for at least 30 minutes. The primary outcome was the change in pulse oximetry associated with prone positioning, measured on room air, with supplemental oxygen, and approximately 30 minutes after initiating prone positioning. Median and mean differences were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and paired t-test.

RESULTS: Of the 440 patients with coronavirus disease 2019, 31 met inclusion criteria. Median pulse oximetry increased as 83% (interquartile range, 75%-86%) on room air, 90% (interquartile range, 89%-93%) with supplemental oxygen, and 96% (interquartile range, 94%-98%) with prone positioning (z = -4.48, P < .001). A total of 45% (n = 14) were intubated during their hospital stay, and 26% (n = 8) of the included patients died.

DISCUSSION: In patients with coronavirus disease 2019 who are awake, alert, and spontaneously breathing, an initially low pulse oximetry reading improved with prone positioning. Future studies are needed to determine the association of prone positioning with subsequent endotracheal intubation and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-287.e1
JournalJournal of Emergency Nursing
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Emergency Nurses Association

Keywords

  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome
  • Coronavirus disease 2019
  • prone position
  • Patient Positioning/methods
  • Prone Position
  • COVID-19/complications
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Oximetry
  • Medical Records
  • Hypoxia/complications
  • Male
  • Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications
  • New Jersey
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • Female
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Intubation, Intratracheal

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Prone Positioning of Patients With Coronavirus Disease 2019 Who Are Nonintubated in Hypoxic Respiratory Distress: Single-Site Retrospective Health Records Review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this