Promoting the exclusive feeding of own mother's milk through the use of hindmilk and increased maternal milk volume for hospitalized, low birth weight infants (< 1800 grams) in Nigeria: A feasibility study

Tina Slusher, Rebecca Hampton, Fidelia Bode-Thomas, Sunday Pam, Francis Akor, Paula Meier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A feasibility study was used to determine (1) if hindmilk feedings of own mother's milk, as reported in the United States, could be instituted in a Nigerian neonatal intensive care unit and result in adequate infant weight gain without exogenous additives; and (2) if the use of a hospital-grade electric breast pump to separate foremilk from hindmilk was feasible in this setting. Mean weight gain for 16 preterm infants during the hindmilk intervention (18.8 g/d) exceeded intrauterine standards without the use of exogenous substances. At the time of hospital discharge, mean maternal daily milk volume was 342 mL/kg/d, indicating that the infants, on average, had 90% more milk available to them than they required. Mean infant weight gains were 14.2 and 16.6 g/d from 1 to 7 and 8 to 23 (̄× = 14.8) days postdischarge, respectively. Therefore, hindmilk feedings are effective and feasible for hospitalized, low birth weight infants in developing countries, and lactation specialists may use our protocol for further research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-198
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003

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Feasibility Studies
Low Birth Weight Infant
Nigeria
Weight Gain
Milk
Mothers
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Lactation
Premature Infants
Developing Countries
Breast
Research

Keywords

  • Breast pumps
  • Breastfeeding
  • Developing countries
  • Low birth weight

Cite this

Promoting the exclusive feeding of own mother's milk through the use of hindmilk and increased maternal milk volume for hospitalized, low birth weight infants (< 1800 grams) in Nigeria : A feasibility study. / Slusher, Tina; Hampton, Rebecca; Bode-Thomas, Fidelia; Pam, Sunday; Akor, Francis; Meier, Paula.

In: Journal of Human Lactation, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.12.2003, p. 191-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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