Prolonged induced hypothermia in hemorrhagic shock is associated with decreased muscle metabolism: A nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics study

Elizabeth R Lusczek, Daniel R. Lexcen, Nancy E. Witowski, Charles Determan, Kristine E. Mulier, Gregory J Beilman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hemorrhagic shock is a leading cause of trauma-related death in war and is associated with significant alterations in metabolism. Using archived serum samples from a previous study, the purpose of this work was to identify metabolic changes associated with induced hypothermia in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock. Twelve Yorkshire pigs underwent a standardized hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation protocol to simulate battlefield injury with prolonged evacuation to definitive care in cold environments. Animals were randomized to receive either hypothermic (33 C) or normothermic (39 C) limited resuscitation for 8 h, followed by standard resuscitation. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate serum metabolites from these animals at intervals throughout the hypothermic resuscitation period. Animals in the hypothermic group had a significantly higher survival rate (P = 0.02) than normothermic animals. Using random forest analysis, a difference in metabolic response between hypothermic and normothermic animals was identified. Hypothermic resuscitation was characterized by decreased concentrations of several muscle-related metabolites including taurine, creatine, creatinine, and amino acids. This study suggests that a decrease in muscle metabolism as a result of induced hypothermia is associated with improved survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-84
Number of pages6
JournalShock
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Hypothermia
  • hemorrhagic shock
  • metabolomics

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