Prolonged colonisation with escherichia coli O25:ST131 versus other extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli in a long-term care facility with high endemic level of rectal colonisation, the Netherlands, 2013 to 2014

Ilse Overdevest, M. Haverkate, J. Veenemans, Y. Hendriks, C. Verhulst, A. Mulders, W. Couprie, M. Bootsma, J. Johnson, J. Kluytmans

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Abstract

The extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)- producing Escherichia coli clone ST131 (ESBL-ST131) has spread in healthcare settings worldwide. The reasons for its successful spread are unknown, but might include more effective transmission and/or longer persistence. We evaluated the colonisation dynamics of ESBL-producing E. coli (ESBL-EC), including ESBL-ST131, in a long-term care facility (LTCF) with an unusually high prevalence of rectal ESBL-EC colonisation. During a 14-month period, rectal or faecal samples were obtained from 296 residents during six repetitive prevalence surveys, using ESBL-selective culture. Transmission rates, reproduction numbers, and durations of colonisation were compared for ESBL-ST131 vs other ESBL-EC. Furthermore, the likely time required for ESBL-ST131 to disappear from the LTCF was estimated. Over time, the endemic level of ESBL-ST131 remained elevated whereas other ESBL-EC returned to low-level prevalence, despite comparable transmission rates. Survival analysis showed a half-life of 13 months for ESBL-ST131 carriage, vs two to three months for other ESBL-EC (p < 0.001). Per-admission reproduction numbers were 0.66 for ESBL-ST131 vs 0.56 for other ESBL-EC, predicting a mean time of three to four years for ESBL-ST131 to disappear from the LTCF under current conditions. Transmission rates were comparable for ESBL-ST131 vs other ESBL-EC. Prolonged rectal carriage explained the persistence of ESBL-ST131 in the LTCF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEurosurveillance
Volume21
Issue number42
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2016

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