Professional stress and well-being of K-12 teachers in alternative educational settings: A leadership agenda

John L. Romano, Kyla Wahlstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

A total of 215 K-12 educators who teach in alternative educational programmes were surveyed about their stress and well-being. Quantitative and qualitative responses were received from 60% of the teachers surveyed. Data showed that these educators experience moderate to high stress levels and that high stress is negatively related to several domains of well-being. Major sources of stress included student demands, physical demands of teaching, and lack of funding. Stress levels were most highly correlated with parental and colleague interactions and after-school class preparation. A strong commitment to the professional position was related to reduced stress levels. Elementary school educators experienced greater stress compared with those teaching older students, and females experienced more stress compared with males. Years of teaching experience did not differentiate stress levels. Implications of the study for school districts and educators in alternative programmes are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-135
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Leadership in Education
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Professional stress and well-being of K-12 teachers in alternative educational settings: A leadership agenda'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this