Professional development: Training for professionalism as a foundation for competent practice in psychology

Nancy S. Elman, Joyce Illfelder-Kaye, William N. Robiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

80 Scopus citations

Abstract

Professional development (PD) is a broad, albeit vaguely defined, construct that underlies psychologists' education and training and is intrinsic to professional functioning, or professionalism, throughout psychologists' careers. This article resulted from the deliberations of a working group at the November 2002 Competencies Conference: Future Directions in Education and Credentialing in Professional Psychology. The authors propose a definition of PD and consider professionalism to be its outcome. They then focus on 2 elements of professionalism - interpersonal functioning and thinking like a psychologist-and address related development and assessment implications for training and practice. Recommendations and implications for professional psychology organizations and for training and lifelong practices of psychologists emerged for further consideration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-375
Number of pages9
JournalProfessional Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

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