Productivity, taxes, and hours worked in Spain

1970–2015

Juan C. Conesa, Timothy J Kehoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the early 1970s, hours worked per working-age person in Spain were higher than in the United States. Starting in 1975, however, hours worked in Spain fell by 40%. We find that 80% of the decline in hours worked can be accounted for by the evolution of taxes in an otherwise standard neoclassical growth model. Although taxes play a crucial role, we cannot argue that taxes drive all of the movements in hours worked. In particular, the model underpredicts the large decrease in hours in 1975–1986 and the large increase in hours in 1994–2007. The lack of productivity growth in Spain during 1994–2015 has little impact on the model’s prediction for hours worked.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-223
Number of pages23
JournalSERIEs
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Tax
Spain
Productivity
Hours worked
Productivity growth
Prediction model
Neoclassical growth model

Keywords

  • Distortionary taxes
  • Dynamic general equilibrium
  • Hours worked
  • Total factor productivity

Cite this

Productivity, taxes, and hours worked in Spain : 1970–2015. / Conesa, Juan C.; Kehoe, Timothy J.

In: SERIEs, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.08.2017, p. 201-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Conesa, Juan C. ; Kehoe, Timothy J. / Productivity, taxes, and hours worked in Spain : 1970–2015. In: SERIEs. 2017 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 201-223.
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