Process learning time as an adaptive design variable in concept learning using computer-based instruction

Robert D. Tennyson, Seong Ik Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Investigated the effects of manipulating the display time of interrogatory examples in a concept-learning experiment according to individual processing needs. Extending the (see PA, Vols 66:6674 and 70:6652), 2-stage concept-learning theory by R. D. Tennyson et al it was hypothesized that prototype formation (Stage 1) requires an increase in the amount of information in the initial instructional period, whereas classification skill development (Stage 2) requires an increase in "reasonable" processing time in the latter instructional period. Data analyses using posttest and retention test scores showed that, for 96 9th-grade students studying 3 biological concepts via computer-based instruction, decreasing display time of interrogatory examples for incorrect answers (thereby increasing the amount of information) and increasing display time for correct answers (thereby increasing processing time) was better than several alternative procedures. These alternatives are (1) decreasing display time for correct answers and increasing it for incorrect answers (reversal of hypothesis), (2) controlling display time but without adjustment for responses, and (3) allowing for learner control of display time. Findings are discussed in reference to information processing theory and use of instructional display time as an adaptive design variable. (35 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-465
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1984

Keywords

  • display time of interrogating examples in computer based instruction, biological concept learning, 9th graders

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