Procedures: Do we really want to know them? An examination of the effects of procedural justice on self-esteem

Holly A. Schroth, Priti Pradhan Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

115 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the effects of procedural justice on state-dependent self-esteem using the group-value model and attribution theory to present competing theoretical perspectives. The group-value model predicts a positive relationship between self-esteem and fair procedures. In contrast, attribution theory suggests procedural fairness interacts with outcome favorability to influence self-esteem. Thus, fair procedures will result in higher self-esteem ratings than unfair procedures when the outcome is positive but will result in lower self-esteem ratings than unfair procedures when the outcome is negative. The results of a laboratory and field study provide converging evidence to support the attribution theory predictions. The results of a 2nd laboratory study suggest that self-esteem is influenced by outcome expectancies, not actual outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)462-471
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume85
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2000

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