Problematic Eating Behaviors Are More Prevalent in African American Women Who Are Overweight or Obese Than African American Women Who Are Lean or Normal Weight

Katelyn Opichka, Chery Smith, Allen S Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Problematic eating behaviors such as overeating and loss of control over consumption can lead to obesity. Problematic eating behaviors among women of differing body mass indexes were explored through focus group methodology, the Palatable Eating Motives Scale (PEMS), and a taste test in a sample of low-income African American women (n = 45). Women who were overweight or obese (W-O/O) reported more problematic eating behaviors including eating in the absence of hunger, frequent overeating, and increased food thoughts than women who were lean or normal weight (W-L/N). The W-O/O appear to possess more problematic eating behaviors than W-L/N.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-89
Number of pages9
JournalFamily and Community Health
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Feeding Behavior
African Americans
Weights and Measures
Hyperphagia
Eating
Hunger
Focus Groups
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Food

Keywords

  • African American women
  • African Americans
  • Native American women
  • low income
  • obesity
  • overeating
  • problematic eating behaviors

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Cite this

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