Prime time

Sexual health outcomes at 24 months for a clinic-linked intervention to Prevent pregnancy risk behavior

Renee E Sieving, Annie-Laurie McRee, Barbara J McMorris, Kara J. Beckman, Sandra L Pettingell, Linda H Bearinger, Ann E Garwick, Jennifer A Oliphant, EdD, MPH, Shari Plowman, Michael D Resnick, Molly Secor-Turner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Importance: Preventing early pregnancy among vulnerable adolescents requires innovative and sustained approaches. Prime Time, a youth development intervention, aims to reduce pregnancy risk among adolescent girls seeking clinic services who are at high risk for pregnancy. Objective: To evaluate sexual risk behaviors and related outcomes with a 24-month postbaseline survey, 6 months after the conclusion of the Prime Time intervention. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community and school-based primary care clinics. Participants: Of 253 sexually active 13- to 17-yearold girls meeting specified risk criteria, 236 (93.3%) completed the 24-month follow-up survey. Intervention: Offered during an 18-month period, Prime Time includes case management and youth leadership programs. Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported consistency of condom, hormonal, and dual-method contraceptive use with most recent male sex partner and number of male sex partners in the past 6 months. Results: At 24-month follow-up, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent use of condoms, hormonal contraception, and dual-method contraception than the control group. Intervention participants also reported improvements in family connectedness and self-efficacy to refuse unwanted sex, and reductions in the perceived importance of having sex.Nobetween-group differences were found in the number of recent male sex partners. Conclusions and Relevance: This study contributes to what has been a dearth of evidence regarding youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful but few efforts have emphasized a dual approach of strengthening sexual and nonsexual protective factors while addressing risk. Findings suggest that health services grounded in a youth development framework can lead to long-term reductions in sexual risk among vulnerable youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-340
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA Pediatrics
Volume167
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

Fingerprint

Reproductive Health
Risk-Taking
Pregnancy
Contraception
Condoms
High-Risk Pregnancy
Case Management
Self Efficacy
Sexual Behavior
Health Services
Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Control Groups

Cite this

Prime time : Sexual health outcomes at 24 months for a clinic-linked intervention to Prevent pregnancy risk behavior. / Sieving, Renee E; McRee, Annie-Laurie; McMorris, Barbara J; Beckman, Kara J.; Pettingell, Sandra L; Bearinger, Linda H; Garwick, Ann E; Oliphant, EdD, MPH, Jennifer A; Plowman, Shari; Resnick, Michael D; Secor-Turner, Molly.

In: JAMA Pediatrics, Vol. 167, No. 4, 01.04.2013, p. 333-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{35973599409449eeb00fde447b1d33cd,
title = "Prime time: Sexual health outcomes at 24 months for a clinic-linked intervention to Prevent pregnancy risk behavior",
abstract = "Importance: Preventing early pregnancy among vulnerable adolescents requires innovative and sustained approaches. Prime Time, a youth development intervention, aims to reduce pregnancy risk among adolescent girls seeking clinic services who are at high risk for pregnancy. Objective: To evaluate sexual risk behaviors and related outcomes with a 24-month postbaseline survey, 6 months after the conclusion of the Prime Time intervention. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community and school-based primary care clinics. Participants: Of 253 sexually active 13- to 17-yearold girls meeting specified risk criteria, 236 (93.3{\%}) completed the 24-month follow-up survey. Intervention: Offered during an 18-month period, Prime Time includes case management and youth leadership programs. Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported consistency of condom, hormonal, and dual-method contraceptive use with most recent male sex partner and number of male sex partners in the past 6 months. Results: At 24-month follow-up, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent use of condoms, hormonal contraception, and dual-method contraception than the control group. Intervention participants also reported improvements in family connectedness and self-efficacy to refuse unwanted sex, and reductions in the perceived importance of having sex.Nobetween-group differences were found in the number of recent male sex partners. Conclusions and Relevance: This study contributes to what has been a dearth of evidence regarding youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful but few efforts have emphasized a dual approach of strengthening sexual and nonsexual protective factors while addressing risk. Findings suggest that health services grounded in a youth development framework can lead to long-term reductions in sexual risk among vulnerable youth.",
author = "Sieving, {Renee E} and Annie-Laurie McRee and McMorris, {Barbara J} and Beckman, {Kara J.} and Pettingell, {Sandra L} and Bearinger, {Linda H} and Garwick, {Ann E} and {Oliphant, EdD, MPH}, {Jennifer A} and Shari Plowman and Resnick, {Michael D} and Molly Secor-Turner",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.1089",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "167",
pages = "333--340",
journal = "JAMA Pediatrics",
issn = "2168-6203",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prime time

T2 - Sexual health outcomes at 24 months for a clinic-linked intervention to Prevent pregnancy risk behavior

AU - Sieving, Renee E

AU - McRee, Annie-Laurie

AU - McMorris, Barbara J

AU - Beckman, Kara J.

AU - Pettingell, Sandra L

AU - Bearinger, Linda H

AU - Garwick, Ann E

AU - Oliphant, EdD, MPH, Jennifer A

AU - Plowman, Shari

AU - Resnick, Michael D

AU - Secor-Turner, Molly

PY - 2013/4/1

Y1 - 2013/4/1

N2 - Importance: Preventing early pregnancy among vulnerable adolescents requires innovative and sustained approaches. Prime Time, a youth development intervention, aims to reduce pregnancy risk among adolescent girls seeking clinic services who are at high risk for pregnancy. Objective: To evaluate sexual risk behaviors and related outcomes with a 24-month postbaseline survey, 6 months after the conclusion of the Prime Time intervention. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community and school-based primary care clinics. Participants: Of 253 sexually active 13- to 17-yearold girls meeting specified risk criteria, 236 (93.3%) completed the 24-month follow-up survey. Intervention: Offered during an 18-month period, Prime Time includes case management and youth leadership programs. Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported consistency of condom, hormonal, and dual-method contraceptive use with most recent male sex partner and number of male sex partners in the past 6 months. Results: At 24-month follow-up, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent use of condoms, hormonal contraception, and dual-method contraception than the control group. Intervention participants also reported improvements in family connectedness and self-efficacy to refuse unwanted sex, and reductions in the perceived importance of having sex.Nobetween-group differences were found in the number of recent male sex partners. Conclusions and Relevance: This study contributes to what has been a dearth of evidence regarding youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful but few efforts have emphasized a dual approach of strengthening sexual and nonsexual protective factors while addressing risk. Findings suggest that health services grounded in a youth development framework can lead to long-term reductions in sexual risk among vulnerable youth.

AB - Importance: Preventing early pregnancy among vulnerable adolescents requires innovative and sustained approaches. Prime Time, a youth development intervention, aims to reduce pregnancy risk among adolescent girls seeking clinic services who are at high risk for pregnancy. Objective: To evaluate sexual risk behaviors and related outcomes with a 24-month postbaseline survey, 6 months after the conclusion of the Prime Time intervention. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community and school-based primary care clinics. Participants: Of 253 sexually active 13- to 17-yearold girls meeting specified risk criteria, 236 (93.3%) completed the 24-month follow-up survey. Intervention: Offered during an 18-month period, Prime Time includes case management and youth leadership programs. Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported consistency of condom, hormonal, and dual-method contraceptive use with most recent male sex partner and number of male sex partners in the past 6 months. Results: At 24-month follow-up, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent use of condoms, hormonal contraception, and dual-method contraception than the control group. Intervention participants also reported improvements in family connectedness and self-efficacy to refuse unwanted sex, and reductions in the perceived importance of having sex.Nobetween-group differences were found in the number of recent male sex partners. Conclusions and Relevance: This study contributes to what has been a dearth of evidence regarding youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful but few efforts have emphasized a dual approach of strengthening sexual and nonsexual protective factors while addressing risk. Findings suggest that health services grounded in a youth development framework can lead to long-term reductions in sexual risk among vulnerable youth.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84876061608&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84876061608&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.1089

DO - 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.1089

M3 - Article

VL - 167

SP - 333

EP - 340

JO - JAMA Pediatrics

JF - JAMA Pediatrics

SN - 2168-6203

IS - 4

ER -