Prevalence of oral methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an institutionalized veterans population.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a nosocomial pathogen now of great concern in nursing homes and other institutional settings. MRSA has been well-documented to inhabit the nares, skin wounds, and respiratory tract, but little is known about its presence in the oral cavity. In this study, all patients admitted to an 80-bed VA extended care facility were cultured weekly for 12 weeks to detect the presence of MRSA in the nares, wounds, in-dwelling devices, and the oral cavity. Of a total of 107 participating subjects, 20 cultured positive for oral MRSA, yielding a prevalence of 18.7%, compared with 19.6% prevalence in the nares--the traditionally accepted screening site for MRSA. There was a 91.6% agreement between oral and nasal carriage in subjects, but four of 107 subjects (3.7%) cultured positive for oral MRSA without evidence of nasal carriage. These results suggest that oral MRSA may be more common than previously thought in high-risk settings, with a prevalence comparable with that of nasal infection. Further investigation is necessary to characterize the factors associated with the presence of MRSA in the oral cavity.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prevalence of oral methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an institutionalized veterans population.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this