Pregnancy and parenting support for incarcerated women

Lessons learned

Rebecca J Shlafer, Erica Gerrity, Grant Duwe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are more than 200,000 incarcerated women in U.S. prisons and jails, and it is estimated that 6% to 10% are pregnant. Pregnant incarcerated women experience complex risks that can compromise their health and the health of their offspring. Objectives: Identify lessons learned from a community–university pilot study of a prison-based pregnancy and parenting support program. Methods: A community–university–corrections partnership was formed to provide education and support to pregnant incarcerated women through a prison-based pilot program. Evaluation data assessed women’s physical and mental health concerns and satisfaction with the program. Between October 2011 and December 2012, 48 women participated. Lessons Learned: We learned that providing services for pregnant incarcerated women requires an effective partnership with the Department of Corrections, adaptations to traditional community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches, and resources that support both direct service and ongoing evaluation. Conclusions: Effective services for pregnant incarcerated women can be provided through a successful community– university–corrections partnership.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-378
Number of pages8
JournalProgress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Parenting
pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prisons
Pregnancy
correctional institution
Community-Based Participatory Research
Health
Women's Health
Mental Health
Education
research approach
health
compromise
community
data analysis
mental health
evaluation
resources
education

Keywords

  • Community health partnerships
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Health disparities
  • Prisoners
  • Women’s health

Cite this

Pregnancy and parenting support for incarcerated women : Lessons learned. / Shlafer, Rebecca J; Gerrity, Erica; Duwe, Grant.

In: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 371-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a9ab079c124a4f1da1fbe83f793b7320,
title = "Pregnancy and parenting support for incarcerated women: Lessons learned",
abstract = "Background: There are more than 200,000 incarcerated women in U.S. prisons and jails, and it is estimated that 6{\%} to 10{\%} are pregnant. Pregnant incarcerated women experience complex risks that can compromise their health and the health of their offspring. Objectives: Identify lessons learned from a community–university pilot study of a prison-based pregnancy and parenting support program. Methods: A community–university–corrections partnership was formed to provide education and support to pregnant incarcerated women through a prison-based pilot program. Evaluation data assessed women’s physical and mental health concerns and satisfaction with the program. Between October 2011 and December 2012, 48 women participated. Lessons Learned: We learned that providing services for pregnant incarcerated women requires an effective partnership with the Department of Corrections, adaptations to traditional community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches, and resources that support both direct service and ongoing evaluation. Conclusions: Effective services for pregnant incarcerated women can be provided through a successful community– university–corrections partnership.",
keywords = "Community health partnerships, Community-based participatory research, Health disparities, Prisoners, Women’s health",
author = "Shlafer, {Rebecca J} and Erica Gerrity and Grant Duwe",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1353/cpr.2015.0061",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "371--378",
journal = "Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action",
issn = "1557-0541",
publisher = "Johns Hopkins University Press",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pregnancy and parenting support for incarcerated women

T2 - Lessons learned

AU - Shlafer, Rebecca J

AU - Gerrity, Erica

AU - Duwe, Grant

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Background: There are more than 200,000 incarcerated women in U.S. prisons and jails, and it is estimated that 6% to 10% are pregnant. Pregnant incarcerated women experience complex risks that can compromise their health and the health of their offspring. Objectives: Identify lessons learned from a community–university pilot study of a prison-based pregnancy and parenting support program. Methods: A community–university–corrections partnership was formed to provide education and support to pregnant incarcerated women through a prison-based pilot program. Evaluation data assessed women’s physical and mental health concerns and satisfaction with the program. Between October 2011 and December 2012, 48 women participated. Lessons Learned: We learned that providing services for pregnant incarcerated women requires an effective partnership with the Department of Corrections, adaptations to traditional community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches, and resources that support both direct service and ongoing evaluation. Conclusions: Effective services for pregnant incarcerated women can be provided through a successful community– university–corrections partnership.

AB - Background: There are more than 200,000 incarcerated women in U.S. prisons and jails, and it is estimated that 6% to 10% are pregnant. Pregnant incarcerated women experience complex risks that can compromise their health and the health of their offspring. Objectives: Identify lessons learned from a community–university pilot study of a prison-based pregnancy and parenting support program. Methods: A community–university–corrections partnership was formed to provide education and support to pregnant incarcerated women through a prison-based pilot program. Evaluation data assessed women’s physical and mental health concerns and satisfaction with the program. Between October 2011 and December 2012, 48 women participated. Lessons Learned: We learned that providing services for pregnant incarcerated women requires an effective partnership with the Department of Corrections, adaptations to traditional community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches, and resources that support both direct service and ongoing evaluation. Conclusions: Effective services for pregnant incarcerated women can be provided through a successful community– university–corrections partnership.

KW - Community health partnerships

KW - Community-based participatory research

KW - Health disparities

KW - Prisoners

KW - Women’s health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84946736739&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84946736739&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1353/cpr.2015.0061

DO - 10.1353/cpr.2015.0061

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 371

EP - 378

JO - Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action

JF - Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action

SN - 1557-0541

IS - 3

ER -