Predictors of liver transplant patient survival: A critical review using a holistic framework

Lisiane Pruinelli, Karen A Monsen, Cynthia R Gross, David M. Radosevich, Gyorgy J Simon, Bonnie L Westra

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Liver transplantation is a costly and risky procedure, representing 25 050 procedures worldwide in 2013, with 6729 procedures performed in the United States in 2014. Considering the scarcity of organs and uncertainty regarding prognosis, limited studies address the variety of risk factors before transplantation that might contribute to predicting patient's survival and therefore developing better models that address a holistic view of transplant patients. This critical review aimed to identify predictors of liver transplant patient survival included in large-scale studies and assess the gap in risk factors from a holistic approach using the Wellbeing Model and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement. Data Source: Search of the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medline, and PubMed from the 1980s to July 2014. Study Selection: Original longitudinal large-scale studies, of 500 or more subjects, published in English, Spanish, or Portuguese, which described predictors of patient survival after deceased donor liver transplantation. Data Extraction: Predictors were extracted from 26 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Data Synthesis: Each article was reviewed and predictors were categorized using a holistic framework, the Wellbeing Model (health, community, environment, relationship, purpose, and security dimensions). Conclusions: The majority (69.7%) of the predictors represented the Wellbeing Model Health dimension. There were no predictors representing the Wellbeing Dimensions for purpose and relationship nor emotional, mental, and spiritual health. This review showed that there is rigorously conducted research of predictors of liver transplant survival; however, the reported significant results were inconsistent across studies, and further research is needed to examine liver transplantation from a whole-person perspective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-106
Number of pages9
JournalProgress in Transplantation
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Body regions
  • Liver transplant predictors
  • Liver transplant recipient
  • Liver transplantation
  • Patient survival
  • Well-being

Cite this