Predictors of abusive supervision: Supervisor perceptions of deep-level dissimilarity, relationship conflict, and subordinate performance

Bennett J. Tepper, Sherry E. Moss, Michelle K Duffy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

207 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The moral exclusion literature identifies three previously unexamined predictors of abusive supervision: supervisor perceptions of deep-level dissimilarity, relationship conflict, and subordinate performance. Invoking theory and research on workplace diversity, relationship conflict, and victim precipitation, we model the three predictors as associated with abusive supervision. Path-analytic tests using data collected from supervisor- subordinate dyads at two time points suggest that supervisor perceptions of relationship conflict and subordinate performance mediate the relationship between perceived deep-level dissimilarity and abusive supervision and that relationship conflict mediates that between perceived deep-level dissimilarity and abusive supervision when supervisors perceive subordinates as having low performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-294
Number of pages16
JournalAcademy of Management Journal
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

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Supervisory personnel
Dissimilarity
Predictors
Relationship conflict
Supervisors
Abusive supervision

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Predictors of abusive supervision : Supervisor perceptions of deep-level dissimilarity, relationship conflict, and subordinate performance. / Tepper, Bennett J.; Moss, Sherry E.; Duffy, Michelle K.

In: Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 54, No. 2, 01.04.2011, p. 279-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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