Predicting recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection following encapsulated fecal microbiota transplantation

Christopher M Staley, Thomas Kaiser, Byron P Vaughn, Carolyn T. Graiziger, Matthew J Hamilton, Tauseef Ur Rehman, Kevin Song, Alexander Khoruts, Michael J Sadowsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI). The use of freeze-dried, encapsulated donor material for FMT (cap-FMT) allows for an easy route of administration and remains clinically effective in the majority of rCDI patients. We hypothesized that specific shifts in the microbiota in response to cap-FMT could predict clinical outcome. We further evaluated the degree of donor microbiota engraftment to determine the extent that donor transfer contributed to recovery. Results: In total, 89 patients were treated with 100 separate cap-FMTs, with a success rate (no rCDI 60 days post cap-FMT) of 80%. Among responders, the lower alpha diversity (ANOVA P < 0.05) observed among patient's pre-FMT samples was restored following cap-FMT. At 1 week post-FMT, community composition varied by clinical outcome (ANOSIM P < 0.001), with similar abundances among families (Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Bacteroidaceae) in responder and donor samples. Families that showed differential abundances by outcome (response vs. recurrence) from samples collected 7 days following cap-FMT were used to construct a regression tree-based model to predict recurrence. Results showed a training accuracy of 100% to predict recurrence and the model was 97% accurate against a test data set of samples collected 8-20 days following cap-FMT. Evaluation of the extent of engraftment using the Bayesian algorithm SourceTracker revealed that approximately 50% of the post-FMT communities of responders were attributable to donor microbiota, while an additional 20-30% of the communities were similar to a composite healthy microbiota consisting of all donor samples. Conclusions: Regression tree-based analyses of microbial communities identified taxa significantly related to clinical response after 7 days, which can be targeted to improve microbial therapeutics. Furthermore, reinstatement of a healthy assemblage following cap-FMT was only partially attributable to explicit donor engraftment and continued to develop towards an overall healthy assemblage, independent of donor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number166
JournalMicrobiome
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2018

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile
  • Encapsulated microbiota
  • Fecal microbiota transplantation
  • Machine learning
  • Microbial community structure
  • Prediction model

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