Predicting Predatory Outcomes in the Context of Carryover Effects: Interactions between Juvenile Frogs and Spider Predators

Melissa B Youngquist, Michael I. Sitvarin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

As representatives of organisms with complex life histories, frogs provide an ideal system to study predator-induced carryover effects: how the risk of predation in one life stage can impact predator-prey interactions in a later stage. Invertebrate predation on frogs has been widely reported, although studies of the behavioral mechanisms underlying their interactions in the terrestrial stage have been lacking. We made detailed observations of interactions between a wolf spider (Tigrosa helluo) and Blanchard's cricket frog (Acris blanchardi) to determine factors that predict capture success and to evaluate potential carryover effects from aquatic predation risk. Juvenile frogs, reared with or without dragonfly predator cues, were placed in an arena with or without spider cues and allowed to interact with a spider. Spiders captured frogs, and an interaction between frog size and activity predicted frog survival. We found no evidence that either aquatic or terrestrial cues altered frog behavior or survival. By preying upon a demographically important life stage, spiders may contribute to population dynamics in frogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)601-608
Number of pages8
JournalEthology
Volume121
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • Acris blanchardi
  • Activity
  • Antipredator behavior
  • Cues
  • Size
  • Tigrosa helluo

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