Predict: A simple risk score for clinical severity and long-term prognosis after hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina: The Minnesota heart survey

David R Jacobs Jr, Candyce Kroenke, Richard Crow, Mahesh Deshpande, Dong Feng Gu, Lael C Gatewood, Henry Blackburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

174 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background - We evaluated short- and long-term mortality risks in 30- to 74-year-old patients hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina and developed a new score called PREDICT. Methods and Results - PREDICT was based on information routinely collected in hospital. Predictors abstracted from hospital record items pertaining to the admission day, including shock, heart failure, ECG findings, cardiovascular disease history, kidney function, and age. Comorbidity was assessed from discharge diagnoses, and mortality was determined from death certificates. For 1985 and 1990 hospitalizations, the 6-year death rate in 6134 patients with 0 to 1 score points was 4%, increasing stepwise to 89% for ≥ 16 points. Score validity was established by only slightly attenuated mortality prediction in 3570 admissions in 1970 and 1980. When case severity was controlled for, 6-year risk declined 32% between 1970 and 1990. When PREDICT was held constant, 24% of those treated with thrombolysis died in 6 years compared with 31% of those not treated. Conclusions - The simple PREDICT risk score was a powerful prognosticator of 6-year mortality after hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-607
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume100
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 1999

Keywords

  • Angina
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Thrombolysis

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