Potentially serious drug-drug interactions among community-dwelling older adult dental patients

Daniel D. Skaar, Heidi O'Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Reducing adverse drug events, including those resulting from drug-drug interactions, will be a health safety issue of increasing importance for dental practitioners in the coming decades as greater numbers of older adults seek oral health care. The purpose of this study was to identify prescription drugs with the potential for serious interactions and estimate prevalent use among older adults visiting the dentist. Study design: The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey is an ongoing series of nationally representative surveys of Medicare beneficiaries. Potentially serious drug interactions were selected with the use of published work by Partnership to Prevent Drug-Drug Interactions. Drug interactions were identified and prevalence estimates made for community-dwelling older adults visiting the dentist. Analyses were completed to test associations between sociodemographic and health-related variables and the use of prescription drugs with the potential for serious interactions. Results: Overall, 3.4% of those visiting the dentist were estimated to have been prescribed drugs with the potential for a serious drug interaction. Drugs commonly prescribed in dentistry with the potential for serious interactions include the benzodiazepines, macrolide antibiotics, and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory analgesics. Conclusions: Understanding potentially harmful drug combinations, their clinical consequences, and the frequency with which implicated drugs are being prescribed will assist practitioners in clinically managing patients and avoiding inappropriate prescribing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-160
Number of pages8
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology
Volume112
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Potentially serious drug-drug interactions among community-dwelling older adult dental patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this