Potentially Inappropriate Antidepressant Prescriptions Among Older Adults in Office-Based Outpatient Settings: National Trends from 2002 to 2012

Taeho Greg Rhee, Jon C. Schommer, Benjamin D. Capistrant, Ronald L. Hadsall, Donald L. Uden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using data from 2002 to 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, we estimated that the prevalence of overall antidepressant prescriptions increased almost twofold from 5.2% in 2002 to 10.1% in 2012 in office-based outpatient visits made by older adults. In addition, older adults were exposed to the risk of potentially avoidable adverse drug events in approximately one in ten antidepressant-related visits, or 2.2 million visits annually. Amitriptyline and doxepin were the two most frequent disease-independent potentially inappropriate antidepressants. Racial/ethnic minorities, and Medicaid beneficiaries had higher odds of potentially inappropriate antidepressant prescriptions (P < 0.05). Efforts to minimize potentially inappropriate antidepressant prescriptions are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-235
Number of pages12
JournalAdministration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Keywords

  • Antidepressant
  • Beers Criteria
  • Inappropriate use
  • Office-based care
  • Older adults
  • Prescribing pattern

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