Potential link between plant and fungal distributions in a dipterocarp rainforest: Community and phylogenetic structure of tropical ectomycorrhizal fungi across a plant and soil ecotone

Kabir G. Peay, Peter G. Kennedy, Stuart J. Davies, Sylvester Tan, Thomas D. Bruns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

137 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relatively little is known about diversity or structure of tropical ectomycorrhizal communities or their roles in tropical ecosystem dynamics. In this study, we present one of the largest molecular studies to date of an ectomycorrhizal community in lowland dipterocarp rainforest. We sampled roots from two 0.4 ha sites located across an ecotone within a 52 ha forest dynamics plot. Our plots contained > 500 tree species and > 40 species of ectomycorrhizal host plants. Fungi were identified by sequencing ribosomal RNA genes. The community was dominated by the Russulales (30 species), Boletales (17), Agaricales (18), Thelephorales (13) and Cantharellales (12). Total species richness appeared comparable to molecular studies of temperate forests. Community structure changed across the ecotone, although it was not possible to separate the role of environmental factors vs host plant preferences. Phylogenetic analyses were consistent with a model of community assembly where habitat associations are influenced by evolutionary conservatism of functional traits within ectomycorrhizal lineages. Because changes in the ectomycorrhizal fungal community parallel those of the tree community at this site, this study demonstrates the potential link between the distribution of tropical tree diversity and the distribution of tropical ectomycorrhizal diversity in relation to local-scale edaphic variation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)529-542
Number of pages14
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume185
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Plant Dispersal
Dipterocarpaceae
ecotones
rain forests
Fungi
Soil
fungi
Thelephorales
phylogeny
Cantharellales
host plants
Russulales
Boletales
soil
Agaricales
fungal communities
temperate forests
Ecosystem
lowlands
community structure

Keywords

  • Borneo
  • Community assembly
  • Comparative phylogenetics
  • Dipterocarpaceae
  • Edaphic
  • Functional trait
  • Lambir Hills National Park
  • Niche

Cite this

Potential link between plant and fungal distributions in a dipterocarp rainforest : Community and phylogenetic structure of tropical ectomycorrhizal fungi across a plant and soil ecotone. / Peay, Kabir G.; Kennedy, Peter G.; Davies, Stuart J.; Tan, Sylvester; Bruns, Thomas D.

In: New Phytologist, Vol. 185, No. 2, 01.01.2010, p. 529-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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