Posttraumatic stress disorder and retrospectively reported stressor exposure: A longitudinal prediction model

Daniel W. King, Lynda A. King, Darin J. Erickson, Mina T. Huang, Erica J. Sharkansky, Jessica Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

There has been recent concern about the degree to which posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology influences reports of prior exposure to highly stressful life events. In this longitudinal study of 2,942 male and female Gulf War veterans, the authors documented change in stressor reporting across 2 occasions and the association between change and PTSD symptom severity. A regression-based cross-lagged analysis was used to examine the relationship between PTSD symptom severity and later reported stressor exposure. Shifts in reporting over time were modestly associated with PTSD symptom severity. The cross-lagged analysis revealed a marginal association between Time 1 PTSD symptom severity and Time 2 reported stressor exposure for men and suggested that later reports of stressor exposure are primarily accounted for by earlier reports and less so by earlier PTSD symptomatology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)624-633
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of abnormal psychology
Volume109
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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