Postsynaptic adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in coronary and femoral vascular beds

D. G. Chen, X. Z. Dai, R. J. Bache

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the response to intra-arterial norepinephrine and sympathetic nerve stimulation on perfusion pressure of cannulated dog femoral and left circumflex coronary arteries perfused at constant flow rates. Sympathetic nerve stimulation was delivered through the decentralized inferior cardiac nerve and the lumbar sympathetic chain; β-adrenergic blockade was maintained with propranolol. In the coronary artery, the vasoconstrictor response to norepinephrine was blunted by α1-adrenergic blockade with prazosin but was abolished by α2-adrenergic blockade with rauwolscine, indicating postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. In the femoral artery, prazosin decreased norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction by 20-40%; the subsequent addition of rauwolscine completely abolished vasoconstriction, indicating that both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors contributed to vasoconstriction. Sympathetic nerve stimulation produced frequency-dependent increases of perfusion pressure in both coronary and femoral vascular beds. Prazosin caused ~50% reduction in the vasoconstrictor response of the coronary vascular bed and ~30% reduction in the femoral bed. The addition of rauwolscine completely blocked the response to sympathetic nerve stimulation in coronary and femoral vascular beds. These studies demonstrate that postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptor-mediated mechanisms participate in vasoconstriction in response to both exogenous norepinephrine and sympathetic nerve stimulation in the canine coronary and femoral vascular beds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23/5
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume254
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1988

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