Postcardiac transplant survival in the current era in patients receiving continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices

Forum D Kamdar, Ranjit John, Peter M Eckman, Monica Colvin-Adams, Sara J Shumway, Kenneth Liao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices have become the standard of care for patients with heart failure requiring mechanical circulatory support as a bridge to transplant. However, data on long-term post-transplant survival for these patients are limited. We evaluated the effect of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices on postcardiac transplant survival in the current era. Methods: All patients who received a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device as a bridge to transplant at a single center from June 2005 to September 2011 were evaluated. Results: Of the 167 patients who received a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device as a bridge to transplant, 77 (46%) underwent cardiac transplantation, 27 died before transplantation (16%), and 63 (38%) remain listed for transplantation and continued with left ventricular assist device support. The mean age of the transplanted patients was 54.5 ± 11.9 years, 57% had an ischemic etiology, and 20% were women. The overall mean duration of left ventricular assist device support before transplantation was 310 ± 227 days (range, 67-1230 days). The mean duration of left ventricular assist device support did not change in patients who had received a left ventricular assist device in the early period of the study (2005-2008, n = 62) compared with those who had received a left ventricular assist device later (2009-2011, n = 78, 373 vs 392 days, P = NS). In addition, no difference was seen in survival between those patients supported with a left ventricular assist device for fewer than 180 days or longer than 180 days before transplantation (P = NS). The actuarial survival after transplantation at 30 days and 1, 3, and 5 years by Kaplan-Meier analysis was 98.7%, 93.0%, 91.1%, and 88.0%, respectively. Conclusions: The short- and long-term post-transplant survival for patients bridged with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device in the current era has been excellent. Furthermore, the duration of left ventricular assist device support did not affect post-transplant survival. The hemodynamic benefits of ventricular unloading with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices, in addition to their durability and reduced patient morbidity, have contributed to improved post-transplant survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-581
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume145
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

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