Post-sexual assault cigarette smoking: Findings from a randomized clinical trial of a video-based intervention

Kate Walsh, Amanda K. Gilmore, Julie A. Schumacher, Scott F. Coffey, Patricia A. Frazier, Linda Ledray, Ron Acierno, Kenneth J. Ruggiero, Dean G. Kilpatrick, Heidi S. Resnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sexual assault (SA) is associated with elevated risk for cigarette smoking. The current study tested whether a brief video intervention delivered in the emergency department was effective at reducing smoking following SA. Participants were 233 girls and women (age 15+) who received a SA medical forensic examination (SAMFE) and were randomized to one of three conditions: 1) Prevention of Post-Rape Stress (PPRS), a brief video designed to reduce post-SA psychopathology; 2) Pleasant Imagery and Relaxation Information (PIRI), an active control video involving relaxation training; and 3) treatment as usual (TAU). Among those who participated at baseline, 154 participants completed at least one follow-up at 1.5, 3, and 6 months after the SAMFE. Participants reported the number of days of smoking and the average number of cigarettes smoked per day in the two weeks prior to the sexual assault as well as in the two weeks prior to each follow-up. Two-thirds (68.8%) of participants smoked prior to the SA or during any follow-up. One-fifth of participants who did not smoke prior to the SA smoked at one or more follow-ups. Smoking declined on average over follow-up although TAU was associated with increased initial smoking compared to PPRS; PPRS and PIRI did not differ. SA contributes to increases in smoking and the PPRS, a brief and cost-effective video-based intervention delivered during the SAMFE, can protect against increases in post-SA smoking. Trial registration: NCT01430624

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106121
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume100
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

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Tobacco Products
Randomized Controlled Trials
Smoking
Rape
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Smoke
Psychopathology
Hospital Emergency Service
Costs
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Brief intervention
  • Emergency department
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Sexual assault
  • Smoking

Cite this

Post-sexual assault cigarette smoking : Findings from a randomized clinical trial of a video-based intervention. / Walsh, Kate; Gilmore, Amanda K.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Coffey, Scott F.; Frazier, Patricia A.; Ledray, Linda; Acierno, Ron; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Resnick, Heidi S.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 100, 106121, 01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walsh, K, Gilmore, AK, Schumacher, JA, Coffey, SF, Frazier, PA, Ledray, L, Acierno, R, Ruggiero, KJ, Kilpatrick, DG & Resnick, HS 2020, 'Post-sexual assault cigarette smoking: Findings from a randomized clinical trial of a video-based intervention', Addictive Behaviors, vol. 100, 106121. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106121
Walsh, Kate ; Gilmore, Amanda K. ; Schumacher, Julie A. ; Coffey, Scott F. ; Frazier, Patricia A. ; Ledray, Linda ; Acierno, Ron ; Ruggiero, Kenneth J. ; Kilpatrick, Dean G. ; Resnick, Heidi S. / Post-sexual assault cigarette smoking : Findings from a randomized clinical trial of a video-based intervention. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2020 ; Vol. 100.
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