Positive Impacts of a Vegetable Cooking Skills Program Among Low-Income Parents and Children

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a vegetable-focused cooking skills and nutrition program on parent and child psychosocial measures, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability. Design: Baseline and postcourse surveys collected 1-week after the course. Setting: Low-income communities in Minneapolis–St Paul. Participants: Parent–child dyads (n = 89; one third each Hispanic, African American, and white) with complete pre-post course data; flyer and e-mail recruitment. Intervention(s): Six 2-hour-weekly sessions including demonstration, food preparation, nutrition education lessons, and a meal. Main Outcome Measures: Parental cooking confidence and barriers, food preparation/resource management, child self-efficacy and cooking attitudes, vegetable liking, vegetable variety, and vegetable home availability. Analysis: Pre-post changes analyzed with paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results were significant at P <.05. Results: Increased parental cooking confidence (4.0 to 4.4/5.0), healthy food preparation (3.6 to 3.9/5.0), child self-efficacy (14.8 to 12.4; lower score = greater self-efficacy), parent liking of vegetables used in the course (7.8 to 8.1/10.0), vegetable variety (30 to 32/37 for parent, 22 to 24/37 for child), and home vegetable availability (16 to 18/35) (all P <.05). Conclusions and Implications: A short-term evaluation of a vegetable-focused cooking and nutrition program for parents and children showed improvements in psychosocial factors, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-440
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Cooking
Vegetables
Parents
Self Efficacy
Food
Postal Service
Nonparametric Statistics
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Meals
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Psychology
Education

Keywords

  • cooking intervention
  • low-income
  • parent–child pairs
  • self-efficacy
  • vegetables

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "Positive Impacts of a Vegetable Cooking Skills Program Among Low-Income Parents and Children",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the impact of a vegetable-focused cooking skills and nutrition program on parent and child psychosocial measures, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability. Design: Baseline and postcourse surveys collected 1-week after the course. Setting: Low-income communities in Minneapolis–St Paul. Participants: Parent–child dyads (n = 89; one third each Hispanic, African American, and white) with complete pre-post course data; flyer and e-mail recruitment. Intervention(s): Six 2-hour-weekly sessions including demonstration, food preparation, nutrition education lessons, and a meal. Main Outcome Measures: Parental cooking confidence and barriers, food preparation/resource management, child self-efficacy and cooking attitudes, vegetable liking, vegetable variety, and vegetable home availability. Analysis: Pre-post changes analyzed with paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results were significant at P <.05. Results: Increased parental cooking confidence (4.0 to 4.4/5.0), healthy food preparation (3.6 to 3.9/5.0), child self-efficacy (14.8 to 12.4; lower score = greater self-efficacy), parent liking of vegetables used in the course (7.8 to 8.1/10.0), vegetable variety (30 to 32/37 for parent, 22 to 24/37 for child), and home vegetable availability (16 to 18/35) (all P <.05). Conclusions and Implications: A short-term evaluation of a vegetable-focused cooking and nutrition program for parents and children showed improvements in psychosocial factors, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability.",
keywords = "cooking intervention, low-income, parent–child pairs, self-efficacy, vegetables",
author = "Francine Overcash and Allison Ritter and Mann, {Traci L} and Elton Mykerezi and Redden, {Joseph P} and Aaron Rendahl and Vickers, {Zata M} and Reicks, {Marla M}",
year = "2018",
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AU - Overcash, Francine

AU - Ritter, Allison

AU - Mann, Traci L

AU - Mykerezi, Elton

AU - Redden, Joseph P

AU - Rendahl, Aaron

AU - Vickers, Zata M

AU - Reicks, Marla M

PY - 2018/5/1

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate the impact of a vegetable-focused cooking skills and nutrition program on parent and child psychosocial measures, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability. Design: Baseline and postcourse surveys collected 1-week after the course. Setting: Low-income communities in Minneapolis–St Paul. Participants: Parent–child dyads (n = 89; one third each Hispanic, African American, and white) with complete pre-post course data; flyer and e-mail recruitment. Intervention(s): Six 2-hour-weekly sessions including demonstration, food preparation, nutrition education lessons, and a meal. Main Outcome Measures: Parental cooking confidence and barriers, food preparation/resource management, child self-efficacy and cooking attitudes, vegetable liking, vegetable variety, and vegetable home availability. Analysis: Pre-post changes analyzed with paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results were significant at P <.05. Results: Increased parental cooking confidence (4.0 to 4.4/5.0), healthy food preparation (3.6 to 3.9/5.0), child self-efficacy (14.8 to 12.4; lower score = greater self-efficacy), parent liking of vegetables used in the course (7.8 to 8.1/10.0), vegetable variety (30 to 32/37 for parent, 22 to 24/37 for child), and home vegetable availability (16 to 18/35) (all P <.05). Conclusions and Implications: A short-term evaluation of a vegetable-focused cooking and nutrition program for parents and children showed improvements in psychosocial factors, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the impact of a vegetable-focused cooking skills and nutrition program on parent and child psychosocial measures, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability. Design: Baseline and postcourse surveys collected 1-week after the course. Setting: Low-income communities in Minneapolis–St Paul. Participants: Parent–child dyads (n = 89; one third each Hispanic, African American, and white) with complete pre-post course data; flyer and e-mail recruitment. Intervention(s): Six 2-hour-weekly sessions including demonstration, food preparation, nutrition education lessons, and a meal. Main Outcome Measures: Parental cooking confidence and barriers, food preparation/resource management, child self-efficacy and cooking attitudes, vegetable liking, vegetable variety, and vegetable home availability. Analysis: Pre-post changes analyzed with paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results were significant at P <.05. Results: Increased parental cooking confidence (4.0 to 4.4/5.0), healthy food preparation (3.6 to 3.9/5.0), child self-efficacy (14.8 to 12.4; lower score = greater self-efficacy), parent liking of vegetables used in the course (7.8 to 8.1/10.0), vegetable variety (30 to 32/37 for parent, 22 to 24/37 for child), and home vegetable availability (16 to 18/35) (all P <.05). Conclusions and Implications: A short-term evaluation of a vegetable-focused cooking and nutrition program for parents and children showed improvements in psychosocial factors, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability.

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