Population trends in aspirin use for cardiovascular disease prevention 1980-2009: The minnesota heart survey

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20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background-Daily low-dose aspirin is recommended for primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke in higher-risk patients. Population trends in aspirin use for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in an urban population (Minneapolis/St. Paul, 2010 population 2.85 million) from 1980 to 2009 were evaluated. Methods and Results-Surveys of randomly selected adults aged 25 to 74 years were collected at 5-year intervals. Self-reports of regular aspirin use for CVD prevention and history of CVD were obtained. Six cross-sectional surveys included 12 281 men and 14 258 women. Age-adjusted aspirin use for primary prevention increased during this period from 1% to 21% among men and 1% to 12% among women. Aspirin use was highest in those aged 65 to 74 years. For secondary prevention, age-adjusted aspirin use increased from 19% to 74% among men and 11% to 64% among women. While data are based on self-report, a substudy using a biochemical indicator of aspirin use (serum thromboxane B2) supports the validity of self-report. Conclusions-Aspirin for CVD prevention is commonly used by a large and growing portion of the general population. It is not known if this is based on professional advice or self-prescribed use. It is also likely that many who would benefit do not use aspirin and others use aspirin inappropriately.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere002320
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume4
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grant 5R01HL023727-28. This agency played no role in the design, conduct, or writing of this report.

Funding Information:
Nicole Zantek has a financial interest in Endo International PLC. This interest has been reviewed and managed by the University of Minnesota in accordance with its conflict of interest policies. Nicole Zantek has also received research funding from AstraZeneca and Bayer HealthCare. The other authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose. Dr Hirsch earns income from serving on a steering committee for an unrelated clinical trial sponsored by Bayer that has no relationship to this research project. This relationship has been reviewed and managed by the University of Minnesota in accordance with its conflict of interest policies.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 The Authors.

Keywords

  • Aspirin
  • Epidemiology
  • Prevention

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