Population context matters: Predicting the effects of metabolic stress mediated by food availability and predation with an agent- and energy budget-based model

Maxime Vaugeois, Paul A. Venturelli, Stephanie L. Hummel, Chiara Accolla, Valery E. Forbes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Population effects of stressors, such as toxic chemicals or increased temperatures, affecting the energy budgets of organisms are mediated by predation pressure and food availability. However, these two population contexts have mostly been considered separately. Moreover, because the sensitivity of the different pathways of energy to stress may differ, it is difficult to predict combined stressor effects. We used an agent-based model of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to infer the population-level impacts of a hypothetical, sublethal stressor that affects an individual's metabolism (growth, reproduction, maintenance, or assimilation) in systems in which population size is controlled by different combinations of food availability and predation. We found that population-level effects are rarely directly proportional to individual-level effects, and were greater when the stressor impacted assimilation and populations were predation-controlled. Our results suggest that individual-level measurements alone are insufficient for inferring population-level impacts of stressors and that accurate inference hinges on insight into how populations are regulated. We suggest incorporating individual-level data into mechanistic models that take into account both the energy budgets of individuals and the population-level context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number108903
JournalEcological Modelling
Volume416
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2020

Fingerprint

energy budget
food availability
predation
population size
metabolism
effect
energy
temperature
assimilation

Keywords

  • Context-dependent stressor effects
  • Dynamic energy budget theory
  • Ecological risk assessment
  • Individual-based model
  • Population regulating factors
  • Population-level effects of stressors

Cite this

Population context matters : Predicting the effects of metabolic stress mediated by food availability and predation with an agent- and energy budget-based model. / Vaugeois, Maxime; Venturelli, Paul A.; Hummel, Stephanie L.; Accolla, Chiara; Forbes, Valery E.

In: Ecological Modelling, Vol. 416, 108903, 15.01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{58997ab692514b7bb0c6bf3837eb950c,
title = "Population context matters: Predicting the effects of metabolic stress mediated by food availability and predation with an agent- and energy budget-based model",
abstract = "Population effects of stressors, such as toxic chemicals or increased temperatures, affecting the energy budgets of organisms are mediated by predation pressure and food availability. However, these two population contexts have mostly been considered separately. Moreover, because the sensitivity of the different pathways of energy to stress may differ, it is difficult to predict combined stressor effects. We used an agent-based model of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to infer the population-level impacts of a hypothetical, sublethal stressor that affects an individual's metabolism (growth, reproduction, maintenance, or assimilation) in systems in which population size is controlled by different combinations of food availability and predation. We found that population-level effects are rarely directly proportional to individual-level effects, and were greater when the stressor impacted assimilation and populations were predation-controlled. Our results suggest that individual-level measurements alone are insufficient for inferring population-level impacts of stressors and that accurate inference hinges on insight into how populations are regulated. We suggest incorporating individual-level data into mechanistic models that take into account both the energy budgets of individuals and the population-level context.",
keywords = "Context-dependent stressor effects, Dynamic energy budget theory, Ecological risk assessment, Individual-based model, Population regulating factors, Population-level effects of stressors",
author = "Maxime Vaugeois and Venturelli, {Paul A.} and Hummel, {Stephanie L.} and Chiara Accolla and Forbes, {Valery E.}",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2019.108903",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "416",
journal = "Ecological Modelling",
issn = "0304-3800",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Population context matters

T2 - Predicting the effects of metabolic stress mediated by food availability and predation with an agent- and energy budget-based model

AU - Vaugeois, Maxime

AU - Venturelli, Paul A.

AU - Hummel, Stephanie L.

AU - Accolla, Chiara

AU - Forbes, Valery E.

PY - 2020/1/15

Y1 - 2020/1/15

N2 - Population effects of stressors, such as toxic chemicals or increased temperatures, affecting the energy budgets of organisms are mediated by predation pressure and food availability. However, these two population contexts have mostly been considered separately. Moreover, because the sensitivity of the different pathways of energy to stress may differ, it is difficult to predict combined stressor effects. We used an agent-based model of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to infer the population-level impacts of a hypothetical, sublethal stressor that affects an individual's metabolism (growth, reproduction, maintenance, or assimilation) in systems in which population size is controlled by different combinations of food availability and predation. We found that population-level effects are rarely directly proportional to individual-level effects, and were greater when the stressor impacted assimilation and populations were predation-controlled. Our results suggest that individual-level measurements alone are insufficient for inferring population-level impacts of stressors and that accurate inference hinges on insight into how populations are regulated. We suggest incorporating individual-level data into mechanistic models that take into account both the energy budgets of individuals and the population-level context.

AB - Population effects of stressors, such as toxic chemicals or increased temperatures, affecting the energy budgets of organisms are mediated by predation pressure and food availability. However, these two population contexts have mostly been considered separately. Moreover, because the sensitivity of the different pathways of energy to stress may differ, it is difficult to predict combined stressor effects. We used an agent-based model of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to infer the population-level impacts of a hypothetical, sublethal stressor that affects an individual's metabolism (growth, reproduction, maintenance, or assimilation) in systems in which population size is controlled by different combinations of food availability and predation. We found that population-level effects are rarely directly proportional to individual-level effects, and were greater when the stressor impacted assimilation and populations were predation-controlled. Our results suggest that individual-level measurements alone are insufficient for inferring population-level impacts of stressors and that accurate inference hinges on insight into how populations are regulated. We suggest incorporating individual-level data into mechanistic models that take into account both the energy budgets of individuals and the population-level context.

KW - Context-dependent stressor effects

KW - Dynamic energy budget theory

KW - Ecological risk assessment

KW - Individual-based model

KW - Population regulating factors

KW - Population-level effects of stressors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076241919&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85076241919&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2019.108903

DO - 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2019.108903

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85076241919

VL - 416

JO - Ecological Modelling

JF - Ecological Modelling

SN - 0304-3800

M1 - 108903

ER -