Polymers for virai gene delivery

Chun Wang, Phuong Truc Pham

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The development of viral vectors capable of providing efficient gene transfer in diseased tissues without causing any pathogenic effects is pivotal for overcoming the many challenges facing gene therapy. Objective: Immune responses against viral vectors, inadequate gene expression and inefficient targeting to specific cells in vivo are some of the major problems limiting the clinical utility of viral gene therapy. Methods: This review will focus on recent progress in strategic polymer-based modifications to improve the performance and biocompatibility of a variety of viral vectors. We will discuss the preclinical development of four approaches involving injectable polymers, polyelectrolytes, polymer microspheres and polymer-virus conjugates. Results/conclusion: Much progress has been made in creating 'hybrid' gene delivery vectors that combine the strengths of polymers and viruses. With further optimization, these hybrid vectors, which may be safer and more effective, are likely to succeed in clinical applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-401
Number of pages17
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Delivery
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

Fingerprint

Polymers
Genes
Genetic Therapy
Viruses
Viral Genes
Microspheres
Gene Expression
Injections

Keywords

  • Gene delivery
  • Gene therapy
  • Polymers
  • Viral vectors

Cite this

Polymers for virai gene delivery. / Wang, Chun; Pham, Phuong Truc.

In: Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.04.2008, p. 385-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Wang, Chun ; Pham, Phuong Truc. / Polymers for virai gene delivery. In: Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery. 2008 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 385-401.
@article{637361605dc14f4582a4b70c411a675b,
title = "Polymers for virai gene delivery",
abstract = "Background: The development of viral vectors capable of providing efficient gene transfer in diseased tissues without causing any pathogenic effects is pivotal for overcoming the many challenges facing gene therapy. Objective: Immune responses against viral vectors, inadequate gene expression and inefficient targeting to specific cells in vivo are some of the major problems limiting the clinical utility of viral gene therapy. Methods: This review will focus on recent progress in strategic polymer-based modifications to improve the performance and biocompatibility of a variety of viral vectors. We will discuss the preclinical development of four approaches involving injectable polymers, polyelectrolytes, polymer microspheres and polymer-virus conjugates. Results/conclusion: Much progress has been made in creating 'hybrid' gene delivery vectors that combine the strengths of polymers and viruses. With further optimization, these hybrid vectors, which may be safer and more effective, are likely to succeed in clinical applications.",
keywords = "Gene delivery, Gene therapy, Polymers, Viral vectors",
author = "Chun Wang and Pham, {Phuong Truc}",
year = "2008",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1517/17425247.5.4.385",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "385--401",
journal = "Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery",
issn = "1742-5247",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Polymers for virai gene delivery

AU - Wang, Chun

AU - Pham, Phuong Truc

PY - 2008/4/1

Y1 - 2008/4/1

N2 - Background: The development of viral vectors capable of providing efficient gene transfer in diseased tissues without causing any pathogenic effects is pivotal for overcoming the many challenges facing gene therapy. Objective: Immune responses against viral vectors, inadequate gene expression and inefficient targeting to specific cells in vivo are some of the major problems limiting the clinical utility of viral gene therapy. Methods: This review will focus on recent progress in strategic polymer-based modifications to improve the performance and biocompatibility of a variety of viral vectors. We will discuss the preclinical development of four approaches involving injectable polymers, polyelectrolytes, polymer microspheres and polymer-virus conjugates. Results/conclusion: Much progress has been made in creating 'hybrid' gene delivery vectors that combine the strengths of polymers and viruses. With further optimization, these hybrid vectors, which may be safer and more effective, are likely to succeed in clinical applications.

AB - Background: The development of viral vectors capable of providing efficient gene transfer in diseased tissues without causing any pathogenic effects is pivotal for overcoming the many challenges facing gene therapy. Objective: Immune responses against viral vectors, inadequate gene expression and inefficient targeting to specific cells in vivo are some of the major problems limiting the clinical utility of viral gene therapy. Methods: This review will focus on recent progress in strategic polymer-based modifications to improve the performance and biocompatibility of a variety of viral vectors. We will discuss the preclinical development of four approaches involving injectable polymers, polyelectrolytes, polymer microspheres and polymer-virus conjugates. Results/conclusion: Much progress has been made in creating 'hybrid' gene delivery vectors that combine the strengths of polymers and viruses. With further optimization, these hybrid vectors, which may be safer and more effective, are likely to succeed in clinical applications.

KW - Gene delivery

KW - Gene therapy

KW - Polymers

KW - Viral vectors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=44249124272&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=44249124272&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1517/17425247.5.4.385

DO - 10.1517/17425247.5.4.385

M3 - Review article

C2 - 18426381

AN - SCOPUS:44249124272

VL - 5

SP - 385

EP - 401

JO - Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery

JF - Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery

SN - 1742-5247

IS - 4

ER -